Total newbie here looking for recommendations in electronic/electrotechnic field?

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Greddy

Joined Dec 7, 2019
1
Hello, guys!

Long story short - i am transitioning to very different career (from veterinary medicine (veterinary doctor-surgeon) to IT (java developer). The "problem" is that with my transition and exposure to completely different information and resources, i suddenly became very interested in electronics (in the broadest sense). I know that it is very extensive and wide discipline to master, but i want to be skilled in one or more of these areas(i lack understanding in a sense, so pardon for my description, but i am interested in diy , automotive, robotics, computer electronics?) I hope that i don't sound too naive - i perfectly understand that it requires lots of effort and work. In current situation i am not able to go to uni or college, so i am asking for learning resources (reading - books), videos, projects, articles and so on, which focuses on building strong basics for a beginner. As i understand, the best way to learn is to build something, right?

Thank you very much for your patience.

I hope that my post is in the right place in this forum, sorry if this is not the right thread - admins are free to move it.
 

SamR

Joined Mar 19, 2019
2,590
Here is a resource: https://www.pdfdrive.com/
On it, search for the authors Grob, Floyd, Malvino. All have written introductory college-level electronics books. Some are very recent and still in use. Others may be a few years old but still very relevant introductory electronics material. Good Luck and Welcome to AAC!
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
11,543
Welcome to AAC!
As i understand, the best way to learn is to build something, right?
That's probably one of the best ways to learn. Pick a project appropriate for your skill level and try to understand what each component does and why a particular part was used.

Automotive and computer electronics probably won't be very rewarding. Auto manufactures have closed systems and they don't make information available to non-affiliated people. This is for safety and revenue. Computer electronics are pretty much throwaway. Manufacturers don't want end users repairing hardware because it's a lucrative business.

In addition to learning how to build circuits, you'll also want to learn programming and Linux so you can use microcontrollers and single board computers like Raspberry Pi.
 

Glenn Holland

Joined Dec 26, 2014
705
Welcome to AAC!
That's probably one of the best ways to learn. Pick a project appropriate for your skill level and try to understand what each component does and why a particular part was used.

Automotive and computer electronics probably won't be very rewarding. Auto manufactures have closed systems and they don't make information available to non-affiliated people. This is for safety and revenue. Computer electronics are pretty much throwaway. Manufacturers don't want end users repairing hardware because it's a lucrative business.

In addition to learning how to build circuits, you'll also want to learn programming and Linux so you can use microcontrollers and single board computers like Raspberry Pi.
I've been in both the 2 year and 4 year curriculum for both electronics and physics. I found electronics easier to learn because of the hands on lab experience. The 2 year courses also have practical explanations of various phenomenon instead of the mostly academic approach (pure mathematics) in colleges and universities.
 

USMC_Spike

Joined Jan 23, 2017
14
Greddy, since you are already a veterinarian, you will have a lot of the basics covered.
To learn about electronics may I suggest you find a community college and check out their
electrical engineering technology programs...you can go for a certificate or AAS degree or
both. Because you have basic, English, Math, Chemistry, Speech, etc., you won't need to
retake those subjects and you 'll probably start off with DC, AC, Digital, Solid State Devices,
Linear Integrated Circuits, etc. Along the way you can take some elective classes in Machine Shop,
Auto Motive, Drafting, or something else that will fit your new degree plan.

FYI - I went through the same thing after having completed my Master's in training development
decades ago. One of the things that I ran into was some of the instructor's have big egos and they
don't like to be questioned about the validity of their grading practices on exams.

I wish you the best of luck and just go for it.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
11,543
One of the things that I ran into was some of the instructor's have big egos and they
don't like to be questioned about the validity of their grading practices on exams.
I dropped out because of a department head who thought he knew what I wanted better than I did. I was actually there to learn about things I was doing as an R&D Tech and he thought it was all about getting the degree.
 

USMC_Spike

Joined Jan 23, 2017
14
I dropped out because of a department head who thought he knew what I wanted better than I did. I was actually there to learn about things I was doing as an R&D Tech and he thought it was all about getting the degree.
Amen brother, preaching to the choir here. I was there to learn also. I had a good tube amp background fixing them.
When I started taking apart HP Test Equipment and ran into problems upgrading it...I saw the writing on the wall.
Time to go back to school and learn about all the stuff I wanted and needed to know.

I had three adjunct faculty that were "gods" sent to save the system. They couldn't stand that I would earn an A
in their classes so they made up ways to give me "B's instead. I wasn't smart enough to drop out. I was determined
to make it through in spite of them. And, I even ignored some of the industry experts who advised me to go to a
University where I wouldn't have these problems. Heck, the CC even started not offering the last class that I needed
to graduate by over a year. I had to petition and provide some additional transcripts along with other certifications
and their curriculums demonstrating that I had earned subject mastery of CCs freshman level familiarization course.
I won't go into details but demonstrating subject master meant i was alive, if you didn't you would be dead-end of story.

Good for you being R&D tech. I had a few really good instructors who were able to answer most all of my questions too.
I got lot's of good answers generally!
 
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