Tips/books/path for better understanding

Thread Starter

tt94

Joined Jan 20, 2023
3
Hi,

Im looking for some guidance and tips for books/articles/websites to read and learn about electricity.
I do sometimes work With complex electrical systems and batteries (charge/discharge/repair, ni-cd,litium,lead acid)and digital systems as well.
I have been taking classes in school but i do always feel unconfident with new stuff and I do have a hard time to really understand how it works or how to use my brain sometimes.

I want to understand it enough so i can by my knowledge teach my self and kinda sort/solve/fix new questions that turns up in my head.
I really do lovet working with Therese stuff so i get really frustrated When i get a task that i cant really understand or sort out by confidence.
 

Ian0

Joined Aug 7, 2020
7,016
Electricity or Electronics? If it's electronics then you can't do much better than getting a copy of Horowitz and Hill "The Art of Electronics" ISBN 13: 9780521298377. The early issues are available very cheaply.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
26,685
Start off with learning all you can about the very basic devices and how they interact with AC & DC , i.e. Capacitors, Resistors and Inductors, and associated theory.
This will help giving a good grounding, and then seek out the particular avenue that interests you.
 

SamR

Joined Mar 19, 2019
4,548
Floyd gets a lot of good press and Kangaroo Dave gives him his tip of the hat but he uses some dreadfully intricate algebra instead of complex numbers which is so much easier. Grobb beats him there. Malvino is a bit confusing (I've used several of his books) to me but Boylestad is clear as a bell to me. I'll leave Sedra Smith for the calculus whizzes but it is a good reference source.
 

Exjay

Joined Nov 19, 2015
115
Floyd gets a lot of good press and Kangaroo Dave gives him his tip of the hat but he uses some dreadfully intricate algebra instead of complex numbers which is so much easier. Grobb beats him there. Malvino is a bit confusing (I've used several of his books) to me but Boylestad is clear as a bell to me. I'll leave Sedra Smith for the calculus whizzes but it is a good reference source.
I like Floyd. His book is self-explanatory. He didn't derive any formula, instead he uses the final formula.
 
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