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nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
6,610
http://www.newyorker.com/humor/borowitz-report/unlocked-iphone-worthless-after-f-b-i-spills-glass-of-water-on-it
WASHINGTON ( The Borowitz Report)—Moments after successfully unlocking the San Bernardino iPhone, the F.B.I. rendered the phone permanently useless by spilling a glass of water on it, an F.B.I. spokesman confirmed on Tuesday.

Calling the accident “one of the biggest embarrassments in F.B.I. history,” bureau spokesman Harland Dorrinson told reporters, “There’s no way to express how bad we feel about what happened to that phone.”
 

#12

Joined Nov 30, 2010
18,167
But there is a way to express how badly they feel. Sue Apple and/or threaten to jail the executives to make them get the data out of the wet phone.
There are only a few things more effective than wasting a million dollars of taxpayer money to show how you feel.:D
 

profbuxton

Joined Feb 21, 2014
418
"Accidently"??? Sounds like BS to me. How would so-called professionals even allow a glass of water near something so "critical". Are they really saying that we didn't really crack the phone and now we are covering up.
And if it has been permanently rendered "useless' how would sueing anyone help. Sue the FBI operative who spilled water over it!
 

Thread Starter

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
6,610

profbuxton

Joined Feb 21, 2014
418
I recall many years ago reading an article about a material which went into solution in water at a very fast speed.
In fact the article concluded that the material would go into solution microseconds before water was added, but water did have to be added not just try to "trick" it into dissolving.
The article was very well written with graphs etc and I believe was published in a scientific journal. I think it was written by Isaac Asimov and reprinted in a sci-fi mag.
 

tracecom

Joined Apr 16, 2010
3,944
A supplier of research chemicals - Aldrich Chemical, was offering, today only (oops, now yesterday only) a safe and effective alternative to FORMALdehyde. The new molecule, CASUALdehyde.
That will be perfect for my latest invention: a DIY embalming kit for individuals who are both environmentally conscious and very frugal.
 

killivolt

Joined Jan 10, 2010
742
My first thought was, wouldn't surprise me. I am however still wondering how they will approach retrieving the data.

Does anyone know the Entity hired to accomplish this ? and is it a clone or what?

KV
 

killivolt

Joined Jan 10, 2010
742
Funny one of my part-time jobs awhile back was working for Mcafee, the fact that the Gov has this product at their disposal says one thing as I suspected all a long.

Wether it worthless or not it's not about getting into the iPhone, it's only to create legal precedence, then to gain access on every device out their, not excluding, Gaming boxes etc.

I don't think this is the end of it. Gov overreach will continue till we all say all hail to the Gov.

kv
 

killivolt

Joined Jan 10, 2010
742
I just did the most recent update, Apple said they would have another update for all systems. But, I had another update today, I wonder how much stock Apple is putting into cellebrites -ufed.

I'm sure there will be more hardening to keep the door shut. Reminds me of nursery ryhm, not by the hair of our "chinie chin chin"

The Gov huffed and they puffed and couldn't blow the door down, so they hired a Lawyer.

KV
 
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wayneh

Joined Sep 9, 2010
16,128
The fundamental question in all of this is whether individuals in a free society can have impenetrable hiding places, beyond the reach of law, for either information or physical objects. As an individual, I say hell yes. As a citizen of civil society and an advocate of the rule of law, I'm less certain. I want MY freedom, but I'm not so sure about the douchebags next door.

We can already hide things - physical objects - in ways the authorities can never find. If I bury a knife in the woods, it won't be found. We can do that with information, too, if we avoid writing it down. The government can't (yet) get it out of our brains directly. So I guess part of the conundrum is whether modern technology should be allowed to make it easier to hide your information while simultaneously having it conveniently available.

Personally, I'm still on the side of technology and individual sanctity. If it's hard for the government to search for clues, well, it's just hard, and no one should be compelled to help them do their jobs. Their job would be far easier if they had a time machine. Should I be demonized for not building one for them?
 
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