The Future Circular Collider

Thread Starter

cmartinez

Joined Jan 17, 2007
8,293
I just love it when people start projects thinking in the long term ... it's sad that the vast majority of us (the regular members of this most excellent website) won't be around to see its completion. If it ever gets approved:

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The proposal is for the larger FCC to be built in two stages. The first will begin operating in the mid 2040s and will collide electrons together. It is hoped the increased energy will produce large numbers of Higgs particles for scientists to study in detail.
The second phase will begin in the 2070s and require more powerful magnets, so advanced that they have not yet been invented. Instead of electrons, heavier protons will be used in the search for brand new particles.
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
13,590
I just love it when people start projects thinking in the long term ... it's sad that the vast majority of us (the regular members of this most excellent website) won't be around to see its completion. If it ever gets approved:

No chance in hell this gets built unless there is some sort of prior actual evidence for supersymmetric particles.

We need to think bigger.
https://arxiv.org/abs/2106.02048
The long-term prospect of building a hadron collider around the circumference of a great circle of the Moon is sketched. A Circular Collider on the Moon (CCM) of ∼11000 km in circumference could reach a proton-proton center-of-mass collision energy of 14 PeV -- a thousand times higher than the Large Hadron Collider at CERN -- optimistically assuming a dipole magnetic field of 20 T. Several aspects of such a project are presented, including siting, construction, availability of necessary materials on the Moon, and powering, as well as a discussion of future studies and further information needed to determine the more concrete feasibility of each. Machine parameters and vacuum requirements are explored, and an injection scheme is delineated. Other unknowns are set down. Due to the strong interest from multiple organizations in establishing a permanent Moon presence, a CCM could be the (next-to-) next-to-next-generation discovery machine for high-energy particle physics and a natural successor to next-generation machines, such as the proposed Future Circular Collider at CERN or a Super Proton-Proton Collider in China, and other future machines, such as a Collider in the Sea, in the Gulf of Mexico. A CCM would serve as an important stepping stone towards a Planck-scale collider sited in our Solar System.
 

BobTPH

Joined Jun 5, 2013
9,300
No chance in hell this gets built unless there is some sort of prior actual evidence for supersymmetric particles.
You mean after the last 10 times we have been assured that the next collider would find them, we are no longer sure they exist?
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
13,590
You mean after the last 10 times we have been assured that the next collider would find them, we are no longer sure they exist?
Bingo.

https://home.cern/science/physics/supersymmetry
The Standard Model has worked beautifully to predict what experiments have shown so far about the basic building blocks of matter, but physicists recognize that it is incomplete. Supersymmetry is an extension of the Standard Model that aims to fill some of the gaps. It predicts a partner particle for each particle in the Standard Model. These new particles would solve a major problem with the Standard Model – fixing the mass of the Higgs boson. If the theory is correct, supersymmetric particles should appear in collisions at the LHC.
 

MrAl

Joined Jun 17, 2014
11,734
I just love it when people start projects thinking in the long term ... it's sad that the vast majority of us (the regular members of this most excellent website) won't be around to see its completion. If it ever gets approved:

The way things go now is by 2040 the cost of materials will be so high they won't be able to find enough funding for this nutty adventure.

I thought they were going to build one in space or something, but maybe that was just a casual note.
 

Jerry-Hat-Trick

Joined Aug 31, 2022
592
Has the discovery of the Higgs boson been of any practical use? Just asking as an engineer. In fact, has there been any real progress in physics in the last 50 years?

The only really incredible progress that I’m aware of is the astonishing shrinking of semiconductor geometry to levels which nobody ever thought possible with light lithography.
 

Thread Starter

cmartinez

Joined Jan 17, 2007
8,293
I believe that the current discoveries will eventually (possibly in the far future, at least 200 years or more) will have practical implications.
 
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