The entire Galileo system suffered an unexpected and hitherto unexplained signal outage

Thread Starter

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
6,504
https://www.gsc-europa.eu/system-status/Constellation-Information

https://www.gpsworld.com/galileo-down-over-weekend/
Dear Galileo user,

A new Notice Advisory to Galileo User (NAGU) has been published on the GSC web portal. The NAGU provides information about the following event:

NOTICE ADVISORY TO GALILEO USERS (NAGU) 2019026

DATE GENERATED (UTC): 2019-07-13 20:15

NAGU TYPE: GENERAL
NAGU NUMBER: 2019026
NAGU SUBJECT: SERVICE OUTAGE
NAGU REFERENCED TO: 2019025
START DATE EVENT (UTC): 2019-07-12 01:50
END DATE EVENT (UTC): N/A
SATELLITE AFFECTED: ALL

EVENT DESCRIPTION: UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE, USERS EXPERIENCE A SERVICE OUTAGE. THE SIGNALS ARE NOT TO BE USED.
 

BR-549

Joined Sep 22, 2013
4,938
That's really something. Can you imagine the coverage about such an outage here? What do all the carrier services switch to?


Wait a minute.......google, facebook and amazon....would not put up with it.
 

Thread Starter

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
6,504
That's really something. Can you imagine the coverage about such an outage here? What do all the carrier services switch to?


Wait a minute.......google, facebook and amazon....would not put up with it.
Almost all receivers would have switched automatically to the US or Russian birds, so no loss of function on commercial devices in most cases.
 

Thread Starter

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
6,504
https://www.theregister.co.uk/2019/07/17/europe_gps_satellites_galileo_down/
The Navigation Signal Analysis and Simulation (NavSAS) Group in Italy is one group that has decided to take a closer look and has found several "curious" things in Galileo's signals. For one, the GPS signals are becoming gradually and consistently inaccurate.

What's even odder is that the status of the "signal in space" (SIS) signals are officially listed as "healthy" when they are clearly not. That may be a simple oversight on Galileo's part as it is busy caught up fixing another issue, or may point to a bigger problem and the system may not know it is inaccurate.

And it is wildly inaccurate, especially for a system whose entire purpose is to increase accuracy to within a few meters: the system is producing errors that are out by more than 500 meters.
https://www.gsc-europa.eu/news/galileo-initial-service-recovery-actions-underway

Based on the results of the troubleshooting activities, several elements of the ground infrastructure were re-initiated. The progress is being closely monitored; it is too early to confirm an exact service recovery date.
 

Alec_t

Joined Sep 17, 2013
10,467
Initial phase or not, it begs the question as to how robust is the ground structure to hacking or other attacks?
 

Externet

Joined Nov 29, 2005
1,412
...Almost all receivers would have switched automatically to the US or Russian birds, so no loss of function on commercial devices in most cases.
I do not think many GNSS navigation receivers by satellite have tuners for multiple systems. Read other systems are even forbidden to tune in U.S. If a ship is receiving Glonass or Galileo, it must be turned off when entering U.S. coastal waters. :eek:
Seems the reverse; receiving GPS in Europe+ is not restricted.
 
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Thread Starter

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
6,504
I do not think many GNSS navigation receivers by satellite have tuners for multiple systems. Read other systems are even forbidden to tune in U.S. If a ship is receiving Glonass or Galileo, it must be turned off when entering U.S. coastal waters. :eek:
Seems the reverse; receiving GPS in Europe+ is not restricted.
I would think it would be foolish to have single constellation critical navigation receivers anywhere on the planet after this mess.

Modern Software-defined receivers allow for all possible systems to be used without hardware modifications so I would suspect that most GNSS receivers have multiple system capability.

For the US FCC rules.
https://techcrunch.com/2018/11/15/fcc-approval-of-europes-galileo-satellite-signals-may-give-your-phones-gps-a-boost/
The thing is, American phones couldn’t use Galileo because the FCC has regulations against having ground stations being in contact with foreign satellites. Which is exactly what using Galileo positioning is, though of course it’s nothing sinister.

If you’re in the U.S., then, your phone likely has the capability to use Galileo but it has been disabled in software. The FCC decision today lets device makers change that, and the result could be much-improved location services. (One band not very compatible with existing U.S. navigation services has been held back, but two of the three are now available.)
 

joeyd999

Joined Jun 6, 2011
4,271
The thing is, American phones couldn’t use Galileo because the FCC has regulations against having ground stations being in contact with foreign satellites.
But GPS/Galileo is passive reception (from the "ground station" POV). FCC can restrict bands that I can receive? How is such a rule enforced?
 

Thread Starter

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
6,504
But GPS/Galileo is passive reception (from the "ground station" POV). FCC can restrict bands that I can receive? How is such a rule enforced?
It can't be enforced at the user level with modern electronics. It's the same type of 'governmental power' rule that forbids 'radar receivers' and police scanners in some states, totally useless. The old RS scanners had 'jumpers' for full coverage to get around such nonsense.

https://www.gps.gov/spectrum/foreign/
 
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