The consequences of a nearby neutron star collision...

Discussion in 'General Science' started by cmartinez, Nov 1, 2017.

  1. cmartinez

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  2. OBW0549

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    I think the consequences can be summed up thusly:

    youreScrewed.jpg
     
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  3. nsaspook

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    I'm not worried about about some Satanic neutron star merger, we have our protector.

    screen_shot_20171101_at_3.37.07_pm.png.CROP.promovar-mediumlarge.37.07_pm.png
     
  4. cmartinez

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    That, or you could press the corresponding key in this keyboard layout. :D

    newkey.jpg
     
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  5. nsaspook

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    Sorry but this Scientific American story is a meatless ham sandwich. The title is a standard journalist Doomsday trick click bait.
     
  6. cmartinez

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    o_O ... can you post something with more substance, and more to your liking, then?
     
  7. nsaspook

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    A Nearby Neutron Star Collision Could Cause Calamity on Earth

    I just expected more from Scientific American than a baseless fear mongering title and story about a 1 in a billions chance event. In the article they explain that there’s almost no chance of that happening near earth so why not spend the time explaining something that's actually scientifically reasonable like this.

     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2017
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  8. philba

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    Here's something much more worth worrying about
    [​IMG]
     
  9. Glenn Holland

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    I've always wondered what would happen if two neutron stars or two black holes got too close together and created a gravity neutral zone.

    Since a neutron star or a black hole is held together by intense gravity, a neutral zone between the objects would allow the the material to escape and possibly create a "mini bang".

    Of course I'm probably wrong and that's why I joined the WAHAU Club (Wrong As Hell As Usual). o_O
     
  10. crutschow

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    That makes no sense to me.
    How would such a gravity neutral zone allow material to escape? :confused:
     
  11. Glenn Holland

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    If the neutron star or black hole has any internal pressure that's being counteracted by its own gravitational pressure, then neutralizing its gravitational force by the gravity of another nearby black hole could allow for material to escape.

    I don't know if electron degeneracy pressure is relevant to this case, but here's an article on the subject:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electron_degeneracy_pressure

    There is also some speculation that black holes can become unstable and explode:

    https://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/223869/can-a-black-hole-explode

    The internal pressure might be due to electron degeneration which occurs when the core of a large star (having 1.3 Solar Masses or larger) collapses under the force of gravity and forms a neutron star or a black hole.

    As a layman, I'm just guessing what might happen. Also the state of knowledge about black holes or neutron stars is rather obscure and it's sheer speculation what would happen if two or more of them get too close to each other.
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2017
  12. nsaspook

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    It's not sheer speculation any longer. The received GW and EM signatures match theories of what would be generated as they get close and merge. Science is the power of prediction, it worked.

    https://phys.org/news/2017-11-neutron-star-merger-decades.html

     
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  13. nsaspook

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    The consequences of a nearby neutron star collision

    What are the consequences is a similar question to this:

    Which of the following would be brighter, in terms of the amount of energy delivered to your retina:

    1. A supernova, seen from as far away as the Sun is from the Earth, or

    2. The detonation of a hydrogen bomb pressed against your eyeball?
      [​IMG]
    The supernova is brighter by nine orders of magnitude.

    https://what-if.xkcd.com/73/
     
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  14. BR-549

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    No one has ever seen or detected a star collision. Ever. If two stars are attractive, but not in equilibrium......they will slowly merge, not collide.

    Gravity is like a third or fourth cousin of the electric field. It has an attractive property....but it also has a perpendicular component. In other words....as it pulls......it imparts a torque. This is why we don't see stars colliding all the time.

    Modern science does not know what a field is and they don't know what a wave is.

    Gravity can not be emitted(i.e...converted from a field to a wave)....because it is asymmetric.
    They are not detecting a gravity wave....they are detecting gamma radiation. Gamma radiation can easily change the physical length of matter.

    The electric force is about 10 to the fortieth times greater than gravity. When gravity grows to the electric strength....it will invert matter.....and cause a anti matter explosion......a super nova.

    The electric field can not be overcome.......therefore a black hole can never exist. You will never find a black hole and there are no such things as neutron stars.

    Modern science is STUMPED at what they observe in a star field.......and how to mathematically describe it. Not one mathematician can come up with an equation to explain it.

    It it SO BAD.....that even ignoring all physical laws.........and imagine being able to change the rate of time and changing the length of length(meter)...........THEY STILL CAN'T EXPLAIN THE MOVEMENT OF A GALAXY.

    That failure brings out the kindergarten in us. NOW they have invented dark matter.
    It's all academic snake oil. But they can relate their ass.....to a hole in the ground. That's modern science.
     
  15. nsaspook

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    If your idea is that a black hole can't destroy information I agree with that point but the rest of your points are just the usual nonsense.


     
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  16. Glenn Holland

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    The answer to your question requires a lot of research.

    However it depends on the intensity and wavelength of the radiation from the supernova which is a lot more than the sun. Also, keep in mind that the detonation a fission bomb represents the energy that was originally derived from the collapse of a massive star when Plutonium or uranium was formed.
     
  17. nsaspook

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    The point is even if you do the research it's still the answer to an Absurd Hypothetical Question like the 1 in billions chance of a earth neutron star collision/merger.

    This is a much better question:
    https://what-if.xkcd.com/151/

    How many (or how big of a firefly) fireflies would it take to match the brightness of the Sun?

    [​IMG]

     
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  18. Glenn Holland

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    Once again, the wavelength of the light from a fire fly isn't the same as the photosphere of the sun.

    Furthermore, the power output of the sun is over 1000 watts per square meter at the earth's surface. At that amount of power, the fire flies would be cooked to a crisp!!!
     
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  19. cmartinez

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    I hadn't heard of that site before your first post, NSA... Me and my boy are having a blast reading through all the Q&A... haven't read something this fun in a long time... many thanks for sharing
     
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  20. Glenn Holland

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    If two neutron stars (or black holes) collided anywhere near the earth, everyone would be bending over and kissing their behinds good by instead of reading about astrophysics. :eek: o_O :(
     
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