Temperature control system project

Thread Starter

alexm1992

Joined Dec 19, 2013
7
Hey guys,

It's my first post! I'm am trying to design a circuit where I can specify the temperature of a stainless steel heating coil (2ohm at room temp).
Where i've got to:

I have learnt that the temperature of a coil is related to its resistance levels.


With this formula I have found out what Resistance values are required to heat the coil up to a few temperature levels. For example:
2.6ohm is required to reach 120C.

Now I have what is essentially a small list of resistance values to get set temperatures I'm trying to devise a circuit which can do such a task.

I have only vague memories of electronics from school so any guidance would be appreciated! From some brief research I have found this may be possible via a 'volt devider' or 'wheatston bridge'.

Do any of you geniuses have any thoughts on the best way forward with this?

Alex :)
 

wayneh

Joined Sep 9, 2010
16,102
Hey guys,

It's my first post! I'm am trying to design a circuit where I can specify the temperature of a stainless steel heating coil (2ohm at room temp).
Where i've got to:

I have learnt that the temperature of a coil is related to its resistance levels.


With this formula I have found out what Resistance values are required to heat the coil up to a few temperature levels. For example:
2.6ohm is required to reach 120C.

Now I have what is essentially a small list of resistance values to get set temperatures I'm trying to devise a circuit which can do such a task.

I have only vague memories of electronics from school so any guidance would be appreciated! From some brief research I have found this may be possible via a 'volt devider' or 'wheatston bridge'.

Do any of you geniuses have any thoughts on the best way forward with this?

Alex :)
I wouldn’t rely on your model without talking some measurements to validate it. Predicting the temperature of a heated wire is notoriously difficult. Depending on what you’re doing, coil temperature may be different than the temperature of whatever you measure with a probe or thermostat.
 
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