some (noob) questions, I'd like to design a circuite (pcb?)

Thread Starter

criticalmess

Joined Dec 3, 2022
5
Hi there

I'd like to design a circuite (pcb?) that will control a tiny vibrating motor and activate a pulse of random 1-5 sec every 10-40 (idle) seconds

could anyone please assist?

cheers
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
17,110
Welcome to AAC!
I'd like to design a circuite (pcb?) that will control a tiny vibrating motor and activate a pulse of random 1-5 sec every 10-40 (idle) seconds
To do random intervals, you're going to need a microcontroller. Do you know how to write code for any?
 

Thread Starter

criticalmess

Joined Dec 3, 2022
5
Welcome to AAC!
To do random intervals, you're going to need a microcontroller. Do you know how to write code for any?
cheers :)

actually, no, how complicated should it be? ok, C, should be fairly straight forward, as long as I can connect to that microcontroller and modify the code until it works.

what if instead of "random" actions, it will do a fixed series of actions?

idle 20 sec, activate motor 1 sec, idle 5 sec, activate motor 2 sec and so on

thing is, I'm aiming for a really small device, not sure that with a microcontroller I will be able to keep this constraint
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
31,068
cheers :)

actually, no, how complicated should it be? ok, C, should be fairly straight forward, as long as I can connect to that microcontroller and modify the code until it works.

what if instead of "random" actions, it will do a fixed series of actions?

idle 20 sec, activate motor 1 sec, idle 5 sec, activate motor 2 sec and so on

thing is, I'm aiming for a really small device, not sure that with a microcontroller I will be able to keep this constraint
In reality, your minimum solution will be a microcontroller, in terms of total number of components, physical size, power consumption, etc.
 

BobTPH

Joined Jun 5, 2013
9,259
A microcontroller will replace multiple chips you would need without one. In addition to the micro, you will need as little as 1 capacitor and one MOSFET.
 

Thread Starter

criticalmess

Joined Dec 3, 2022
5
ok, so once I get hold of such a board, it all comes down to programming the microcontroller and attaching power supply + motor to it?
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
31,068
Before going about designing a PCB it would be a good idea to assemble a prototype first and satisfy yourself that you have a working solution. At minimum, you will need an MCU development board and a MOSFET module, something like these:

ATtiny85 module
1670090629806.png

MOSFET module
1670090691889.png
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
19,389
Before going about designing a PCB it would be a good idea to assemble a prototype first and satisfy yourself that you have a working solution. At minimum, you will need an MCU development board and a MOSFET module, something like these:

ATtiny85 module
View attachment 282081

MOSFET module
View attachment 282082
Certainly, prior to designing a circuit board, you will need to have a functioning circuit. Few first efforts start with a circuit board in the real world. And I am guessing about the application of the "small package", suggesting that battery size also matters. A device with a single control button and a sequence of embedded modes is an item that I recently repaired for a friend. The fault was slight corrosion on the battery terminals, easy to fix, and about the only serviceable item in the assembly. An embedded processor under a small glob of black epoxy, and a small unmarked transistor partly under another blob are the only components. So the entire brains and controls fit into a very small cube, about a half inch on every side. Duplicating it would be a serious challenge for most engineers.
 

Ya’akov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
9,264

Jerry-Hat-Trick

Joined Aug 31, 2022
588
The Seeeduino XIAO boards are actually a tiny bit smaller, and have an amazing array of options.
Indeed they are! I've used the XIAO but wrongly assumed the DFRobot was smaller as it has less pins. So I favour Mr Chips' suggestion of the Microchip PIC10 processor which I used for a timer years ago when they were first introduced. They are available in SOT-23 package so relatively easy to glue on their back when making a thru hole prototype assembly.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
19,389
An on/off function for varying time intervals can be simulated with a simple binary counter and a CD4060 oscillator/counter IC. That could be a small package if the SMD version of the IC is used.
What is the application that requires such a small package? There might be an alternative scheme that will work which has not been mentioned. My current guess is a personal entertainment toy device.
 
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