Software Engineer education relevant for Embedded Engineering?

Thread Starter

StrongPenguin

Joined Jun 9, 2018
219
I don't really know where I should post this, but I want the end result to be me working with embedded systems and microcontrollers.

I live in a very small country, with limited options regarding education. My education is Marine Engineer, which is not a "real" engineering degree in the traditional sense, because it lacks the heavy math, but more a mixed bag of relevant topics required to operate a ship, power plant, power grid, and so on. We had quite a lot of electrical subjects. If I look at the curriculum for an EE student, I can see I have been through some of it.

Now I'd like to formalise my education a bit more, by getting a second education (Hey, they are free..) on the side. And the closest education I can get is Software Engineering (Not C.S)

I told the education leader that my interest lies in embedded systems, he said there was not much in the curriculum that is related to embedded, only some Arduino. But he recommended me to write the bachelor thesis on something that would interest me more. And I reckon this applies to the whole course, just write about embedded stuff where ever you can. And there is no C coding..

So, the question. Would I be able to get a job as an embedded engineer, given my background in Marine and Software Engineering?
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
10,072
I don't really know where I should post this,
Career advising.

In my opinion, I think a computer engineering degree would be more useful than computer science. Computer engineering will expose you to hardware and software, whereas computer science won't touch on hardware much, if at all.
 

Thread Starter

StrongPenguin

Joined Jun 9, 2018
219
@dl324 Oops, I forgot about that subforum. Maybe a moderator can move it. (Which it was, I see now)

I would LOVE to get a Computer Engineer education, if it were possible. Like I said, the closest thing is Software Engineering, but it is possible to take a master in Computer Engineering. That would be sweet.
 

Thread Starter

StrongPenguin

Joined Jun 9, 2018
219
@dl324 Great example of a specific education not being the ultimate factor of your success or skills. Of course, he had a MS in EE, which does help, but he probably also had a great interest for circuit design.

@Walter Literowich I am learning every day. I should do more, though. But I would still like to enroll in a new education, just out of pure interest, and I have the time for it given my job as a maritime engineer.
 
@dl324 Great example of a specific education not being the ultimate factor of your success or skills. Of course, he had a MS in EE, which does help, but he probably also had a great interest for circuit design.

@Walter Literowich I am learning every day. I should do more, though. But I would still like to enroll in a new education, just out of pure interest, and I have the time for it given my job as a maritime engineer.
 
of course you can do whatever you want, but taking a course is like - asking someone to feed you as opposed to learning to feed yourself

you cannot learn to ride a bicycle in a course, but if you get on the bike and learn by yourself ...you will be educated and confident I may be a bit more painful at first ...but it will serve you for your life time.
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
6,951
IMO to be a good embedded software engineer you must know hardware. You don't need to be an expert but basic competence is a must to refine initial system designs to the point they are robust and efficient in resources. I don't care how much natural talent you have, formal education and talent allows you to communicate as a team with a common framework.
 

Thread Starter

StrongPenguin

Joined Jun 9, 2018
219
It also depends on the person I knew people with a BSEE from UC Berkeley and an MSEE from Standford who worked as technicians.
I don't know if working as a technician with an MSEE from Stanford is impressive, or not, since I don't know what they do, but I suspect not. Totally agree, it depends on the person and talent.

IMO to be a good embedded software engineer you must know hardware. You don't need to be an expert but basic competence is a must to refine initial system designs to the point they are robust and efficient in resources. I don't care how much natural talent you have, formal education and talent allows you to communicate as a team with a common framework.
Yeah, I'd reckon hardware to be the main focus, but sadly with the education options here, I won't be able to focus on hardware until my MS. Guess I could fill in the blanks later on with taking single hardware courses between my BS and MS in another country.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
10,072
I don't know if working as a technician with an MSEE from Stanford is impressive, or not, since I don't know what they do, but I suspect not. Totally agree, it depends on the person and talent.
Engineers would typically have more intellectually challenging and rewarding jobs and command a higher salary.
 
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