Singularity functions

Thread Starter

studiot

Joined Nov 9, 2007
4,998
The Singularity Function is of less use to Electrical / Electronics Engineers, who only use one of the available functions. than to Structural Engineers who use 5.

Singularity functions are of class n where n runs from -2 through 0 to +2 for functions of engineering interest.

Singularity functions have no indefinite integral, but possess definite integrals running from -infinity to x.

They form a series such that this integral of a function of order n is the next one up in the series and the derivative is the next one down.

The singularity function of interest to EEs is called the dirac delta function or the (unit) impulse function in physics. It is of class n = -1

Its derivative is called a doublet or a couple, of class n=-2

Its integral is called the (Heaviside) step function, of class zero.
 

amilton542

Joined Nov 13, 2010
497
I've of heard of the dirac delta function but I have never had time to look into it. The only disadvantage in choosing EE as your chosen path is that you're kept so busy with the engineering aspects I find myself not touching areas in maths that we should be. It's reached a point now where I have to regulate my thirst for maths, for example, will I ever have a use for this?

If I had it my way, I'd like to see more advanced linear algebra methods being introduced alongside tensors as a core component to electrical engineering. Maths for the electrical engineer student starts to converge around about the Laplace transform point. I feel more emphasis needs to be placed on vectors, tensors and linear algebra.
 

MrAl

Joined Jun 17, 2014
7,590
Hi,

It probably depends on what you intend to specialize in, but of all you'll most likely use the step function, impulse function, and maybe the ramp function. You should at least be familiar with those three if not any others, and then take on others as you find the need, if you are really that pressed for time.
 

Thread Starter

studiot

Joined Nov 9, 2007
4,998
@amilton542
Mathematically, Laplace (and other) transforms, tensors, definite integrals are all part of linear algebra.
They are all mathematical vectors in some vector space or other.

EE is again lucky in that linear methods suffice for the most part.
Other branches of engineering again have to deal with non linearity more often.

However I am glad if this thread is of use to someone.
 

amilton542

Joined Nov 13, 2010
497
I wasn't compromising your thread, I read yours with great interest and noticed you're a man of wisdom. I was just saying, that was all.
 
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