Semi exploded component. Trying to identify for replacement.

Thread Starter

paul.aston

Joined Feb 21, 2020
5
Equipment: Cylinda FT426 washing machine
Board: Invensys 475630AC
Background: The wire to the drainage pump got caught by the hook of a stabilising spring, which caused it to wear, and eventually break, causing a short to earth through the frame (tripping the house fuses in the process). I repaired the wire and ran the washing machine to test. It ran fine until it came to drainage part of the cycle, and then threw an error.

On further investigation I found a component by the pump wire connector that appears to have blown - Some small black fragments in the casing, and a small soot stain. Nothing else appears to be damaged, and as I say, the machine appears to run. So in an ideal world I'd like to replace the part, not the board - which to be honest will probably be more than the machine is worth.

The problem is that the plastic face of the component blew, so I have no markings to work from - which I know makes identification difficult - but I would appreciate any best guesses you may have.

I've attached the best pictures I can get, please let me know if you need any more information.
front.jpeg

back.jpeg

the_board.jpeg
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
21,191
Rough stab/guess, the components appear to be somewhat identified by type by the first character(s) That one shows TC which could possibly be Triac?
As typified by resistors 2R and VDR as VR etc.
If it is switching an AC device then most likely is a Triac and should not be difficult to sub via a little reverse-engineering!.
Max.
 

Thread Starter

paul.aston

Joined Feb 21, 2020
5
Ah, sorry - could/should have been clearer: It's the black semiconductor. The MOV is dinged but seems to be okay
MOV designator: 2VR200
Semi designator: 2TC203
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
21,191
If it is a Triac it would normally be controlling an AC device, a simple trace may bring some light to it, and if it is, the device specs should enable a suitable replacement.
Max.
 

Thread Starter

paul.aston

Joined Feb 21, 2020
5
If it is a Triac it would normally be controlling an AC device, a simple trace may bring some light to it, and if it is, the device specs should enable a suitable replacement.
Max.
That would seem logical since it's activating the drainage pump.

The frustrating thing is that any in-depth specs for this machine seem impossible to find. However, a search for Triac 203 seems to lead me at least to the right looking kind of product. I will have to take a stab at guessing the trigger gates/voltage/amps

Times like this I wish that I'd stuck with electrical engineering at school, and not got distracted by computers...
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
21,191
Triac's are fairly easy to sub, as the specs are generally not all that critical, working voltage and current capacity are the prime values.
Over-sizing does not always cause a problem.
The reverse engineering already suggested will also help in picking a replacement! ;) .
Max.
 

Thread Starter

paul.aston

Joined Feb 21, 2020
5
Thank you for the help! I feel a great deal more enlightened than when I started, and I think with some gentle probing I should be able to work out the values.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
21,191
Possibly a little strange to have a triac on a drain pump. it would normally be a ON/OFF operation?
IOW, no need for RPM control.
Unless just used an an ON/OFF switching device.
Max.
 

Thread Starter

paul.aston

Joined Feb 21, 2020
5
Ah - now, I did have a problem with the door release, which I assumed was because the pump didn't run. So maybe this is connected to that, and the pump is a whole other issue in itself.

And the door lock & drain pump are in the same cable connector, next to the blown component
 
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