Review of electric circuit with Arduino

Thread Starter

iaistudent

Joined Jun 30, 2022
4
Hi guys!

I am currently working on a project for which I am in charge of the electronic circuit. However I have never worked with electronics before, therefore I am really desperate and unsure whether what I am doing is correct. If someone could help me out, that would be great! :)

So basically my goal is to heat and shape set the "sma wire" by Joule heating. For this I have to come up with a arduino controlled circuit that can heat the wire and depending on the temperature (measured by thermal camera) reached, I have to adapt the temperature again via adaptable voltage/current supply.

I hope I expressed myself clear enogh for someone to understand. I have attached my design for the circuit. Maybe someone could give me his/her opinion :))
 

Attachments

LowQCab

Joined Nov 6, 2012
2,171
For what it is, ( a Flow-Chart / Box-Diagram ), it looks kinda "OK".
But, The Devil is in the Details ...........

For a "Purely-Resistive" Heating-Element-Load, ( especially when Battery-Powered ),
the TVS, Capacitor, and Diode are completely unnecessary, and will do nothing.

The Ground from the Battery looks somewhat arbitrary in your drawing.

The FET-Source-Pin, and the FET-Driver must have a substantial Ground directly to the Battery.

The Arduino needs to have it's own separate Ground to the Battery.

I'm not well-versed in the hundreds of different Micro-Controllers,
does your Arduino have a built-in Voltage-Regulator ?

What is the Current rating of your Heating-Element ?

How fast does the Element exceed the desired Temperature from "Cold" ?
If it is very fast You may need to implement a PID strategy in your Controller-Programming
to prevent excessive over/under-shoot of the desired Temperature.
.
.
.
 

Thread Starter

iaistudent

Joined Jun 30, 2022
4
For what it is, ( a Flow-Chart / Box-Diagram ), it looks kinda "OK".
But, The Devil is in the Details ...........

For a "Purely-Resistive" Heating-Element-Load, ( especially when Battery-Powered ),
the TVS, Capacitor, and Diode are completely unnecessary, and will do nothing.

The Ground from the Battery looks somewhat arbitrary in your drawing.

The FET-Source-Pin, and the FET-Driver must have a substantial Ground directly to the Battery.

The Arduino needs to have it's own separate Ground to the Battery.

I'm not well-versed in the hundreds of different Micro-Controllers,
does your Arduino have a built-in Voltage-Regulator ?

What is the Current rating of your Heating-Element ?

How fast does the Element exceed the desired Temperature from "Cold" ?
If it is very fast You may need to implement a PID strategy in your Controller-Programming
to prevent excessive over/under-shoot of the desired Temperature.
.
.
.
thanks for your input!

I thought the TVS, Capacitor are to to snub inductive spikes, which result from the large di/dt values during switching .

What excatly do you mean by "substantial ground directly to the battery?

Yes, the PID will be implemented as well :)
 

AlbertHall

Joined Jun 4, 2014
12,072
12V to power the arduino is fine, but it is the upper limit and a 12V lead acid battery, especially while charging can be up to 14.5V.
 

LowQCab

Joined Nov 6, 2012
2,171
Grounding can be a big bucket of worms, and deserves its own set of books, especially at high frequencies.

Grounding will have zero effect on the fact that a Power-Supply may create
too high of a Voltage for a particular device to tolerate.

Voltage differences between different Ground connections can cause all sorts of "mysterious" problems.

When a Circuit has Capacitive, or Inductive Reactance,
then You need to start paying particular attention to Filtering and Diode-Clamping.
A "Purely-Resistive" Load does not have any Reactance to protect devices from.
.
.
.
 

djsfantasi

Joined Apr 11, 2010
8,394
12V to power the arduino is fine, but it is the upper limit and a 12V lead acid battery, especially while charging can be up to 14.5V.
What particular model of the Arduino are you using? I recommend reading the datasheet for the specific Arduino. Some will accept input voltages up to 20VDC.
 
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