Resistor Storage

Thread Starter

Dr.killjoy

Joined Apr 28, 2013
1,196
I have a box storing my resistors right now which is a pain to find the right one. I tried a couple other different ways that never worked for me .. So I was looking at using small boxes but found them to cost alot of money ..I decided to either use 3"x5" 6mil ziplock bags or small manilla envelopes .. But I wanted to see if you guys have other suggestion or to use bags or envelopes ???


Thanks
 

#12

Joined Nov 30, 2010
18,210
Plastic cabinets with lots of drawers. Layout the values from 1 to 82 across and powers of ten from the bottom up.
Right now I'm using 12 wide and 8 high. 0.1 ohm to 82 meg
 

Thread Starter

Dr.killjoy

Joined Apr 28, 2013
1,196
Plastic cabinets with lots of drawers. Layout the values from 1 to 82 across and powers of ten from the bottom up.
Right now I'm using 12 wide and 8 high. 0.1 ohm to 82 meg
Sorry I forgot that I am still working off my kitchen table and has to be portable..
 

#12

Joined Nov 30, 2010
18,210
The number of containers and the usefulness level are negotiable.
I use 96 containers and it works pretty well, especially because I have been in electronics so long that I can read most resistors as easily as if they were labeled in English.
You might keep a whole row in a bag, like everything that starts with 0.something and rely on your eyes to see the first 2 digits, or you might put everything that starts with "1" in a bag and rely on your eyes to see the third band. At one point, I tried using the plastic boxes that used to hold cassette tapes. You can buy plastic cases for CDs and they will hold resistors of 1/4 and 1/2 watt.
 

SLK001

Joined Nov 29, 2011
1,548
... especially because I have been in electronics so long that I can read most resistors as easily as if they were labeled in English.
I used to use resistors to trim the set frequency of a xtal oscillator. I kept all the trim resistors in a round tin that once had cookies in it. Most of the inspectors were aghast that they weren't in any order, but I told them that I knew every resistor in my "can". If I needed a 12k, my eyes were tuned to brown, red, and orange. Even the technician who worked for me was shocked that I could easily find the value that I wanted. I guess that he never learned to "read" resistors!
 

MrAl

Joined Jun 17, 2014
7,756
Hello there,

Harbor Freight sells storage containers with compartments that are not too expensive. The small ones and large ones have quite a few compartments in them.

I use one of the small ones for my 1/4 watt resistors. I must have 600 or more in one small container.
I make 'labels' out of cut up index cards. I write on the card what values are in that compartment, then put it face down on the bottom of the compartment, then put the resistors in. This way when i turn the case upside down i can see the writing and know what compartment has the range of values that contains the value i need, then turn it right side up and open the case and grab out the resistor(s). Sometimes grabbing a few out then finding the right one out of that bunch. Only takes a couple seconds to get the right value.

I also use the zip lock baggies for other parts like transistors, IC's, etc. The static sensitive ones though have to be in a static proof bag inside the baggie. I then put all the small biggies into a much larger zip lock baggie (like the freezer ones) and that keeps the parts all in one place. It is also a good idea then to write up an inventory of what bag has what parts, and as you use them cross them off the list (or just decrement the count for that part). So a typical entry might be 2N2222 (6) and then after using one 2N2222 (5) and that would appear in the list for "Bag #001" or something like that. You can also keep a list of how many you had when you first bought them, then how many you have left: 2N2222 (6) (5) for example after you use one and you originally bought 6.

You can also keep a list of the large bags and what bags they contain:
Bag 001: resistors
Bag 002: transistors
Bag 003: capacitors
etc.

then a list for what is inside each big bag:
Bag 001:
baggie 001: 1k
baggie 002: 5k
baggie 003: 10k
etc.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
11,251
Before I had cabinets with drawers (the cabinets were metal back then, but now usually plastic), I used coin envelopes and a box. One envelope for each value arranged in ascending order.
 

Thread Starter

Dr.killjoy

Joined Apr 28, 2013
1,196
Here is the end result I was looking at


The number of containers and the usefulness level are negotiable.
I use 96 containers and it works pretty well, especially because I have been in electronics so long that I can read most resistors as easily as if they were labeled in English.
You might keep a whole row in a bag, like everything that starts with 0.something and rely on your eyes to see the first 2 digits, or you might put everything that starts with "1" in a bag and rely on your eyes to see the third band. At one point, I tried using the plastic boxes that used to hold cassette tapes. You can buy plastic cases for CDs and they will hold resistors of 1/4 and 1/2 watt.
I guess its time for me to learn my color code again ..
Never heard of that and will have to try it ..


I used to use resistors to trim the set frequency of a xtal oscillator. I kept all the trim resistors in a round tin that once had cookies in it. Most of the inspectors were aghast that they weren't in any order, but I told them that I knew every resistor in my "can". If I needed a 12k, my eyes were tuned to brown, red, and orange. Even the technician who worked for me was shocked that I could easily find the value that I wanted. I guess that he never learned to "read" resistors!
Pretty cool and I was like that many many years ago and has lot my touch..
From Completed Projects Forum

Storage/Inventory Control
Project | Author | Submitted Resistor Parts Storage | Wendy |06/15/2008
Thanks
I remember that thread but I don't a have a heat sealer and it's cheaper with time and money to buy the bags needed already done ..

My resistors and my electrolytic capacitor storage.
Nice setup and would have the same if I had a work area ..
Hello there,

Harbor Freight sells storage containers with compartments that are not too expensive. The small ones and large ones have quite a few compartments in them.

I use one of the small ones for my 1/4 watt resistors. I must have 600 or more in one small container.
I make 'labels' out of cut up index cards. I write on the card what values are in that compartment, then put it face down on the bottom of the compartment, then put the resistors in. This way when i turn the case upside down i can see the writing and know what compartment has the range of values that contains the value i need, then turn it right side up and open the case and grab out the resistor(s). Sometimes grabbing a few out then finding the right one out of that bunch. Only takes a couple seconds to get the right value.

I also use the zip lock baggies for other parts like transistors, IC's, etc. The static sensitive ones though have to be in a static proof bag inside the baggie. I then put all the small biggies into a much larger zip lock baggie (like the freezer ones) and that keeps the parts all in one place. It is also a good idea then to write up an inventory of what bag has what parts, and as you use them cross them off the list (or just decrement the count for that part). So a typical entry might be 2N2222 (6) and then after using one 2N2222 (5) and that would appear in the list for "Bag #001" or something like that. You can also keep a list of how many you had when you first bought them, then how many you have left: 2N2222 (6) (5) for example after you use one and you originally bought 6.

You can also keep a list of the large bags and what bags they contain:
Bag 001: resistors
Bag 002: transistors
Bag 003: capacitors
etc.

then a list for what is inside each big bag:
Bag 001:
baggie 001: 1k
baggie 002: 5k
baggie 003: 10k
etc.
Really nice setup you have there ..
 

MrAl

Joined Jun 17, 2014
7,756
Here is the end result I was looking at



..
Hi,

That looks pretty good really. Maybe i could do that with some of my parts too that dont conform to the simple shape like the 1/4 watt resistors and low value ceramic caps. Those work out nice in compartment boxes, but larger parts dont work in those boxes as well. I'll have to give this some more thought too because i am looking for a way to clean up my parts inventory too :)
Boxes here, boxes there, makes it harder to deal with.
 

wayneh

Joined Sep 9, 2010
16,399
Like #12, I just use small plastic drawers in a cabinet. Unlike #12, my needs are meager and I have just 3 drawers for all my breadboard resistors. (I have just a random junk box for all the higher power resistors.) I believe my drawers are 0-999Ω, 1K-9.9KΩ and 10k-10MΩ. In each drawer, the resistors are held in the tape that they arrived in, labeled by me with their value, and layered in the drawer by value. It's a little cumbersome but I can find what I need quickly enough.

I'd love to have them more separated and organized, but on the other hand I enjoy being able to just grab the drawers I need and take them to my project.
 

Thread Starter

Dr.killjoy

Joined Apr 28, 2013
1,196
Here is a tip.
Color code the index cards so that the color of the card matches the resistor multiplier. It will make it easier to find and sort your cards.
Oh, btw, you want to remove that tape that holds the resistors together or cut off the ends of the leads where the tape is stuck on.
The gum on the tape can create havoc in a solderless breadboard.
These are amazing ideas and will help me learn the color code..

Hi,

That looks pretty good really. Maybe i could do that with some of my parts too that dont conform to the simple shape like the 1/4 watt resistors and low value ceramic caps. Those work out nice in compartment boxes, but larger parts dont work in those boxes as well. I'll have to give this some more thought too because i am looking for a way to clean up my parts inventory too :)
Boxes here, boxes there, makes it harder to deal with.
I have not made them yet but just saw the pic and thought it was a great idea and will work for any small parts like caps ,diode,leds,and such..

Like #12, I just use small plastic drawers in a cabinet. Unlike #12, my needs are meager and I have just 3 drawers for all my breadboard resistors. (I have just a random junk box for all the higher power resistors.) I believe my drawers are 0-999Ω, 1K-9.9KΩ and 10k-10MΩ. In each drawer, the resistors are held in the tape that they arrived in, labeled by me with their value, and layered in the drawer by value. It's a little cumbersome but I can find what I need quickly enough.

I'd love to have them more separated and organized, but on the other hand I enjoy being able to just grab the drawers I need and take them to my project.
I like the idea and works for alot of people but I am trying to keep compact as to not litter up my work space which already is too small .. Also when I am done it has to be packed up and put back into the closet till I have time again..
 

hp1729

Joined Nov 23, 2015
2,304
I have a box storing my resistors right now which is a pain to find the right one. I tried a couple other different ways that never worked for me .. So I was looking at using small boxes but found them to cost alot of money ..I decided to either use 3"x5" 6mil ziplock bags or small manilla envelopes .. But I wanted to see if you guys have other suggestion or to use bags or envelopes ???


Thanks
2" x 3" pink antistatic bags stuffed in a shoe box. Cost about $3.25 per hundred from Mouser or DigiKey.
 
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