Rechargeable 'D' size batteries

Thread Starter

ApacheKid

Joined Jan 12, 2015
437
I'm looking for the best way to have six D batteries and charger that can hold all six.

I like "enerloop" batteries but it seems they do not make these in sizes other than AA and AAA.

I can find various options for rechargeable D cells but the chargers seem to hold at most four batteries.

The device itself is an electronic kitchen faucet so must contain solenoids of some type and hence needs decent current capacity batteries which is why the chose to use D cells.

Are there options out there?
 

Audioguru again

Joined Oct 21, 2019
3,854
A washroom in a restaurant frequently uses an electronic faucet that turns on when it senses that you are near it.
Why is this one using batteries? Is it portable and it turns on in the middle of no where? Who carries the water?
 

Thread Starter

ApacheKid

Joined Jan 12, 2015
437
Is it meant to be more convenient than a normal tap? How so, if the batteries go flat and it stops working?
Good question and another reason I am increasingly disappointed by technology. The unit is pure battery driven and when the batteries die you cannot even manually turn the water on! I did not buy this my wife did and she simply never thought to look at that, but even I was surprised that they'd design something this way.

These taps do have good features though, for example you can set the max run time so that if you are called away while the tap is on it will auto shut off after X minutes and you can also just wave your hand near it and it switches on/off which is great for a kitchen where you may be working with raw meats etc.

Here:

https://www.lowes.com/pd/Moen-U-By-...mercial-Residential-Kitchen-Faucet/1002650750

Actually I just noticed - there is an "optional" AC adapter...
 

Ian0

Joined Aug 7, 2020
3,766
How about those elbow-operated taps they use in hospitals?
The number of devices that are battery operated for "convenience" is becoming annoying. Cordless mouse? How do you use the computer when the mouse battery is flat? I always use a wired mouse. Sometimes I get my feet caught in the cable and bring it crashing to the floor, but it keeps on working.
 

Thread Starter

ApacheKid

Joined Jan 12, 2015
437
How about those elbow-operated taps they use in hospitals?
The number of devices that are battery operated for "convenience" is becoming annoying. Cordless mouse? How do you use the computer when the mouse battery is flat? I always use a wired mouse. Sometimes I get my feet caught in the cable and bring it crashing to the floor, but it keeps on working.
Yes, I agree, overly fancy ideas that fall short of basic pragmatism, I have a battery mouse and once when I was busy on an pressing issue it died and nobody in the office had a replacement AA battery, the usual stationary cupboard had none (because people pilfer) and I had to go out to a store myself and buy one - insanity, complete stupidity.
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
6,460
you can also just wave your hand near it and it switches on/off
Luke; use the force.

All silliness aside - if the control unit is underneath the sink then why not have an outlet wired to be hot at all times? (use a GFCI outlet for safety reasons) A small power supply providing 9V shouldn't be that hard to find. A "D" cell battery should be able to typically push 4.5 amps (source). Depending on how much current your water valves draw - you should be able to find a PS that can provide sufficient energy. You can even wire up a battery backup, should the power go out. But I'm guessing two things: First, the valves don't draw all that much current. The large battery size is to provide long lasting functionality of the system independent of an AC source such as a power supply. Second, if the valves fail there MUST be a way to turn the water on manually.

Gaud forbid having to open a valve manually.
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
6,460
Afterthought - - - It's likely the valves will also operate on 12 volts. I'd bet (if this were my own home and faucet (tap)) it would work just fine on 12 volts. 12 volt PS's are easy to find. And if I didn't want to wire up something then a small motorcycle battery under the sink should power it for a few years easily. AND it can be recharged over night.
 

crutschow

Joined Mar 14, 2008
28,206
The number of devices that are battery operated for "convenience" is becoming annoying. Cordless mouse? How do you use the computer when the mouse battery is flat? I always use a wired mouse. Sometimes I get my feet caught in the cable and bring it crashing to the floor, but it keeps on working.
I have a cordless mouse on both my computers, and would never go back to a wired one. The cord was always hanging up on something , restricting the free mouse movement.
Batteries are not a problem for me, as half dead AA (which I have a good supply of) will last at least six months of daily use. The mouse will operate down to <1V before it quits.
 
Last edited:

crutschow

Joined Mar 14, 2008
28,206
I used a trackball for a short time and found it difficult to roll the ball to rapidly and accurately move to a precise spot on the screen, such as when drawing schematics.
I think that's why trackballs are not that popular.
I found I could do the task much faster and easier with a mouse.

What do you use a trackball for and why do you think it's "best"?
 

Delta Prime

Joined Nov 15, 2019
1,191
I used a trackball for a short time and found it difficult to roll the ball to rapidly and accurately move to a precise spot on the screen, such as when drawing schematics.
I think that's why trackballs are not that popular.
I found I could do the task much faster and easier with a mouse.

What do you use a trackball for and why do you think it's "best"?
The trackball and the mouse are fundamentally opposites in both design and functionality. Though a normal mouse may be more familiar to use and offer greater precision and control, a trackball offers increased efficiency, wider accessibility, and even helps prevent injury :rolleyes:
 

Wendy

Joined Mar 24, 2008
22,647
It could have something to do with energy density and fire hazard if/when things go wrong (hey, what are the odds?). I use rechargeable lithium AA and AAA with good results.
 

Ian0

Joined Aug 7, 2020
3,766
Afterthought - - - It's likely the valves will also operate on 12 volts. I'd bet (if this were my own home and faucet (tap)) it would work just fine on 12 volts. 12 volt PS's are easy to find. And if I didn't want to wire up something then a small motorcycle battery under the sink should power it for a few years easily. AND it can be recharged over night.
If they are 12V, then perhaps a VRLA battery on permanent float charge? You could use the smallest 12V VRLA and a tiny amount of float charge current, and it could easily provide the current required for the valves.
I have a garden watering timer that controls mains-pressure water and it seems to run for a year on a PP3 (but it only operates once a day and doesn't have to run a proximity sensor)
 
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