quick question on wire type

Thread Starter

clangray

Joined Nov 4, 2018
25
Is anyone aware of breadboard hookup wire that is pliable, flexible? Less stiff than usual hookup wire? I have some sensors I am prototyping that are several feet away from base-board and working with the usual wire is cumbersome.
 

wayneh

Joined Sep 9, 2010
16,398
Is anyone aware of breadboard hookup wire that is pliable, flexible? Less stiff than usual hookup wire? I have some sensors I am prototyping that are several feet away from base-board and working with the usual wire is cumbersome.
I'd use a jack or some other "interface" between the board and the flexible (stranded) cable to the sensor.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
20,911
I either use a dual screw terminals that are .2" spaced and can be slotted together for ganged use or a IDC header and use ribbon cable.
Or even just a few strands of ribbon soldered to the Vero strip board (0.1" spacing).
Max.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
10,985
I'd use ribbon cable with a male header pin crimped on to the end that will be inserted in the breadboard.
From Jameco.com:
upload_2018-12-30_8-57-4.png
This is something I have no problems buying from AliExpress. Much cheaper and they work fine. A ratcheting crimp tool is under $20 (AliExpress).
 

MrSoftware

Joined Oct 29, 2013
1,816
Something like this? Side note; In my own experience these types of wires work OK for DC and low frequency stuff, but for I2C or SPI or anything else that has a relatively higher frequency clock, the connections aren't always reliable enough and communication can be flaky, leading to wasted time and frustration trying to debug the actual problem.
 

Thread Starter

clangray

Joined Nov 4, 2018
25
Something like this? Side note; In my own experience these types of wires work OK for DC and low frequency stuff, but for I2C or SPI or anything else that has a relatively higher frequency clock, the connections aren't always reliable enough and communication can be flaky, leading to wasted time and frustration trying to debug the actual problem.
I was looking at these - problem is my sensor has a very small profile. Its on a 4 x 4 or 2 x 4 mini-breadboard. I'm afraid the black piece that is the jumper in your recommendation will create a reflection, shadow, etc. If I could bend the protruding wire of the piece at a right angle I may be able to both connect the piece and make sure it doesn't obstruct the sensor (IR led). Do you think the protruding wire will sustain bending?
 

Thread Starter

clangray

Joined Nov 4, 2018
25
I'd use a jack or some other "interface" between the board and the flexible (stranded) cable to the sensor.
Basically that's correct. Have to find a solution that will fit breadboard to breadboard with a stranded cable with a breadboard compatible termination.
 

Thread Starter

clangray

Joined Nov 4, 2018
25
I either use a dual screw terminals that are .2" spaced and can be slotted together for ganged use or a IDC header and use ribbon cable.
Or even just a few strands of ribbon soldered to the Vero strip board (0.1" spacing).
Max.
Those will work excellent for the base breadboard. It needed some anchoring and that appears to be fine.
I have to find how to tailor the other end to fit in the mini-breadboard (2x4 or 4 x 4) several feet away. If the terminating piece is too big or overshadowing it could interfere with sensor activity. Ideally just a right-angle wire would be the best for the mini's, but the screw terminals are good to go.
 

Thread Starter

clangray

Joined Nov 4, 2018
25
I'd use ribbon cable with a male header pin crimped on to the end that will be inserted in the breadboard.
From Jameco.com:
View attachment 166739
This is something I have no problems buying from AliExpress. Much cheaper and they work fine. A ratcheting crimp tool is under $20 (AliExpress).
Ok - I've got a regular breadboard that is suitable for this. : )
How do I apply your solution to my "satellite/remote" breadboards (2 x 4 or 4 x 4) from the base breadboard? I'm looking at what you are recommending and it looks very cool, but not clear on how it comes together.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
10,985
How do I apply your solution to my "satellite/remote" breadboards (2 x 4 or 4 x 4) from the base breadboard? I'm looking at what you are recommending and it looks very cool, but not clear on how it comes together.
This is an example:
upload_2018-12-30_12-40-32.png

The white wires go from the breadboard to a SBC. I can't remember if the rainbow jumpers were premade or custom. In either case, your requirements would require a custom length, so you need to make your own.

The white jumpers are #22 stranded, which is probably not flexible enough for your requirements. The rainbow jumpers are standard #28 (7/#36) ribbon cable.

The white jumpers use some female connector that I bought surplus. I don't have the shrouds, so I use heatshrink to keep the connector from spreading when mated to a male header. I use long tail male headers on the breadboard for connections. The rainbow jumpers are either male-male, male-female, or female-female as needed.
 
Last edited:

ArakelTheDragon

Joined Nov 18, 2016
1,350
This is an example:
View attachment 166757

The white wires go from the breadboard to a SBC. I can't remember if the rainbow jumpers were premade or custom. In either case, your requirements would require a custom length, so you need to make you are spiaour own.

The white jumpers are #22 stranded, which is probably not flexible enough for your requirements. The rainbow jumpers are standard #28 (7/#36) ribbon cable.

The white jumpers use some female connector that I bought surplus. I don't have the shrouds, so I use heatshrink to keep the connector from spreading when mated to a male header. I use long tail male headers on the breadboard for connections. The rainbow jumpers are either male-male, male-female, or female-female as needed.
If you are speaking bout my solution, you solder the short part of the header to the wire and plug it where ever you want. It will fit exactly like a normla plug in wire in side of the board. In fact on those chips on the left of the picture you have the same headers. The short is soldered to the chip. the long is plugged in.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
10,985
Hey Max why do you recommend this?
Some people feel that solderless breadboards aren't reliable.

I'm not one of them. Been using them for 40+ years and the only problem I've had is ends of wires breaking off because they were nicked while being stripped (my fault). Breaks were found using standard troubleshooting procedures.
upload_2018-12-30_15-53-56.png
Prototype for a 4x4x4 LED cube. All of the jumpers on the right half were custom made.

I bought some 830-point boards from AliExpress last month for less than $1.25 each (with free shipping that probably goes away in 2019). So far, they've performed as well as my more expensive boards. A common complaint with the cheap ones is that it's difficult to insert wires. That's why I only bought 3; so far, that hasn't been an issue.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
10,985
The connectors and shrouds are called Dupont pins and shells. I use this crimper
upload_2018-12-30_20-57-15.png
which is around $15 shipped.
upload_2018-12-30_20-58-21.pngupload_2018-12-30_20-58-51.pngupload_2018-12-30_20-59-11.png
 
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