Quartz Watch Electronic Module Question

Thread Starter

Arlau94

Joined Mar 17, 2019
5
Hi AAC,

I'll preface this by saying I don't have any background in electronics whatsoever, just thought this seemed the most logical forum to ask a question on an electronic circuit/capacitor.

I'm currently attempting to restore an old Omega Quartz Watch. I've taken it to a watch repairer who noted that the electronic Module appeared to be dead - most likely due to the capacitor expiring. The watch uses an old quartz movement previously manufactured by Omega, it is a Caliber 1337 movement which looks like this:



My question is, how would I go about finding a replacement capacitor for this circuit? More specifically, would there be a way to determine the capacitor value required to make this watch run again? I can't see anything on the capacitor itself to indicate any values.

Thanks for your help
 

Thread Starter

Arlau94

Joined Mar 17, 2019
5
Hello,

It looks like that the battery has been leaking.
The green stuff must be removed to have a good contact with the new battery.
You could try to clean it with a glass fiber pen like in the attached page:
https://www.amazon.com/SE-7616SB-Fiberglass-Scratch-Brush/dp/B003NHDITW

Bertus
Hi Bertus,

Thanks for the quick reply!

The picture above is of a watch with an identical movement/circuit, but not the actual watch in question. Will look into cleaning the battery contacts for mine and see if this works, but I don't think there was any leak.

Cheers,
Adrian
 

Yaakov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
1,612
Hi AAC,

I'll preface this by saying I don't have any background in electronics whatsoever, just thought this seemed the most logical forum to ask a question on an electronic circuit/capacitor.

I'm currently attempting to restore an old Omega Quartz Watch. I've taken it to a watch repairer who noted that the electronic Module appeared to be dead - most likely due to the capacitor expiring. The watch uses an old quartz movement previously manufactured by Omega, it is a Caliber 1337 movement which looks like this:

My question is, how would I go about finding a replacement capacitor for this circuit? More specifically, would there be a way to determine the capacitor value required to make this watch run again? I can't see anything on the capacitor itself to indicate any values.

Thanks for your help
The silver cylinder is not a capacitor, it is the quartz crystal. The only other visible components are the coil that drives the movement and a trimmer capaciator, which does not “expire”.

Sorry to say that from here it appears the advice you were given was dubious.
 

Yaakov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
1,612
wasn't aware leaving a battery in could restore the capacitor, might be worth a try!
Was that a reply to me? There is no capacitor to “restore”. While there might be a fixed capacitor buried under the movement’s plate, and one of the visible components is a sort of capacitor, the crystal isn’t a capacitor and the trimmer doesn’t “expire” or need restoration.
 

djsfantasi

Joined Apr 11, 2010
6,716
wasn't aware leaving a battery in could restore the capacitor, might be worth a try!
Huh? I had to read through this thread several times. Double checked that there was no missing answers. Where did you get the idea that “leaving a battery in could restore a capacitor”?
 

Yaakov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
1,612
Troubleshooting steps, FIRST:

Make sure the battery is good, test it.
Make sure it is installed with the correct polarity, triple check that.

If it is still not working, try moving the battery around a bit to ensure it has a good connection.

Check the movement, see if the sweep second hand is moving AT ALL. If it is, you may have a mechanical problem.
 

Thread Starter

Arlau94

Joined Mar 17, 2019
5
Huh? I had to read through this thread several times. Double checked that there was no missing answers. Where did you get the idea that “leaving a battery in could restore a capacitor”?
confused myself, there was a comment which mentioned leaving the battery in but seems to have been deleted!
 

drc_567

Joined Dec 29, 2008
870
re: previous deleted post ... sorry for the misleading comment regarding the capacitor. Previous experience with large, unused, aging, electrolytic capacitors has shown some refreshing effect with sustained applied voltage, but that would not be the case with a trimmer capacitor ... or maybe even with a miniature electrolytic capacitor. ... Sorry again for the confusion.
 

Thread Starter

Arlau94

Joined Mar 17, 2019
5
Thanks Yaakov, will look into reinstalling the battery again to see if it's a mechanical issue.

I should have elaborated more in the initial post:

I had an omega repair specialist install the new battery and test the circuit and the advice was that the electronic module was no longer functioning (due to being inactive for many years) and that this was likely due to a capacitor no longer functioning - I made the assumption that the capacitor was that grey tube, which was an incorrect one as you've pointed out.

Would it be worth having the repair man remove the electronic module and seeing if I could test it somehow?

this is what the module for the 1337 movement looks like (image taken from a watch forum)



Alternatively, looking into replacing the movement entirely from watch with the same Caliber movement which is still functioning, however I'd be concerned that this may not last in the long run.

Cheers,
 

Alec_t

Joined Sep 17, 2013
11,520
There is no electrolytic capacitor visible in any of the pics above. Trimmer capacitor failure is extremely unlikely, although a speck of conductive debris could short it out.
It would be worth checking with an Ohmmeter that the coil, that reddish cylindrical thing at the bottom of the post #1 pic, which should be connected to the two prongs shown at the bottom of the post #11 pic and also in the post #1 pic, has continuity and is connected correctly.
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
21,664
There could be something lost in the translation of the word "expired".

"Expired" can have two definitions.
1) cease to be valid, typically after a fixed period of time - e.g. Sir, your passport has expired.

2) die - e.g. My car expired on the way up the mountain and I had to walk home.

With regards reviving the Omega watch:

1) Remove the battery.
2) Inspect and clean all battery contacts until all corrosion have been remove.
3) Inspect the rest of the watch for corrosion and/or damage. Clean as required.
4) Adjust the battery contacts for positive action against the battery.
5) Install new battery.
 

Yaakov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
1,612
Thanks Yaakov, will look into reinstalling the battery again to see if it's a mechanical issue.

I should have elaborated more in the initial post:

I had an omega repair specialist install the new battery and test the circuit and the advice was that the electronic module was no longer functioning (due to being inactive for many years) and that this was likely due to a capacitor no longer functioning - I made the assumption that the capacitor was that grey tube, which was an incorrect one as you've pointed out.

Would it be worth having the repair man remove the electronic module and seeing if I could test it somehow?
The fact that the specialist suggested that a "capacitor was no longer functioning" sheds suspicion on his knowledge of the electronics involved. I am not sure if I would trust him to deal with it. The only proviso on this is if there is a known problem with these movements and the one unidentifiable component on the board is a capacitor known to specialists in this watch to degrade.

The only certain capacitor in the circuit is a mechanically adjustable one, used to regulate the watch. That capacitor will not age out. There is one more surface mount device that could be a cap, but it will not age either. So, not running for a long time is irrelevant.

Here's a better picture of the board. I found one for 85 Euro, so they can be gotten. I am not convinced, yet, though, that it is the board causing your problem.
 

Yaakov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
1,612
There could be something lost in the translation of the word "expired".

"Expired" can have two definitions.
1) cease to be valid, typically after a fixed period of time - e.g. Sir, your passport has expired.

2) die - e.g. My car expired on the way up the mountain and I had to walk home.
Because it was the only sensible interpretation, I assumed it meant "failed due to age", which is a variation of your 2.
 
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