Problems with Pspice simulation(inverting op-amp)

Thread Starter

김찬우 1

Joined Oct 8, 2018
11
I am doing my pspice work and i cant understand why this results came out.

upload_2018-11-24_22-46-3.png

inverting gain should be -20k/10k=-2 so the output voltage is -10, but i got -6.769v

and other person's result is like below

upload_2018-11-24_22-48-9.png

i think he's and mine is same, i'm stuck in this problem.
 

MrAl

Joined Jun 17, 2014
7,799
Hi,

Yeah the supply voltage levels are very important especially with the ua741 because the output can not swing all the way to either rail. There could be as much as a 4v difference (maybe more) from rail to output at full swing either way.
The LM358 output on the other hand can get to within about 1.5v of the positive rail and to close to within 0v of the negative rail.
 

Thread Starter

김찬우 1

Joined Oct 8, 2018
11
upload_2018-11-25_1-50-13.png

i made other circuit and i found that amplification of vampl is working well according to the equation but the amplification of offset voltage is not accord to the equation.
 

ericgibbs

Joined Jan 29, 2010
10,752
hi 1,
The LM741 OPA is a very old amplifier with a very low performance specification.
Try a modern OPA.

Do you have an answer for my question in post #2.??

E
 

Jony130

Joined Feb 17, 2009
5,181
In Inverting configuration you need to add a negative supply (Vee) because for positive voltage at the output opamp wants to set the negative value at the output. So you need to add a negative supply into your circuit.
 

bertus

Joined Apr 5, 2008
20,744
Hello,

As said, for the schematic in post #4 you will need a negative power supply too.
Also the 5 Volts given will be to low, as the minimum voltage for the LM741 to work is 6 Volts.
Power the LM741 with + and - 15 Volts and the simulation will likely work.

bertus
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
11,465
LM741 are not for the faint of heart, or those who don't understand opamp specifications. When it was introduced, it was the best thing since sliced bread. That is no longer the case, though it is still useful. Particularly if you use vintage test equipment from that era; Tektronix used it in a number of their designs.
 
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