Please Help, which capacitors should I buy?

Thread Starter

Daniel450

Joined Apr 22, 2018
2
Hi, I am looking to buy the marked capacitor but I don't really know what some of the values mean. (I am attaching a picture) it says rY 10 16v. Does it mean it's a 10uF 16v capacitor and the rY just stands for the brand or something? could I get this? https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/10uF-16V...458598?hash=item1a49fcdee6:g:fOgAAMXQeW5Ta2x1


Please let me know, because I am trying to fix my monitor it just went very dark today and I tested the caps and 3 of them don't show anything and 2 are at 0.04 so I think that they are bad too. Any help would be much appreciated Thanks.
Daniel
 

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AnalogKid

Joined Aug 1, 2013
9,293
10 uF, 16 V aluminum electrolytic capacitor in a surface mount (SMT) package. Most manufacturers have different series of similar parts (lower cost, longer life, tighter tolerance, etc), so the rY mark probably is a series designation so you can find the correct datasheet.

ak
 

Thread Starter

Daniel450

Joined Apr 22, 2018
2
10 uF, 16 V aluminum electrolytic capacitor in a surface mount (SMT) package. Most manufacturers have different series of similar parts (lower cost, longer life, tighter tolerance, etc), so the rY mark probably is a series designation so you can find the correct datasheet.

ak
Thanks for all the information :)
 

AnalogKid

Joined Aug 1, 2013
9,293
Beware - many identical electrolytic capacitors are available in multiple packages, such as short and fat vs tall and thin. Measure carefully the case diameter of the original cap because that is what sets the spacing dimension of the leads.

ak
 

ebp

Joined Feb 8, 2018
2,332
It sort of looks like some of the larger caps with generally similar appearance have the Nippon Chemicon / United Chemicon logo, but there isn't enough detail in the photo to tell.

Those Panasonic caps on ebay appear to be a general purpose type and an obsolete series - which does not necessarily make them unsuitable what make them obsolete, if in fact they are, may have been something like a change in the insulating sleeve material or plating on the leads.
https://media.digikey.com/pdf/Data Sheets/Panasonic Electronic Components/S_Series_Type_V_.pdf
 

ian field

Joined Oct 27, 2012
6,539
It sort of looks like some of the larger caps with generally similar appearance have the Nippon Chemicon / United Chemicon logo, but there isn't enough detail in the photo to tell.

Those Panasonic caps on ebay appear to be a general purpose type and an obsolete series - which does not necessarily make them unsuitable what make them obsolete, if in fact they are, may have been something like a change in the insulating sleeve material or plating on the leads.
https://media.digikey.com/pdf/Data Sheets/Panasonic Electronic Components/S_Series_Type_V_.pdf
Panasonic caps had a bad rep in the 80s/90s - usually blue or purple sleeve through hole type.

I've no info on the SMD stuff.
 

ebp

Joined Feb 8, 2018
2,332
I've used Panasonic caps for a long long time and had no problems with them, but I've generally used a few grades above the low end. They make some excellent high performance types. I've used UCC/NCC and Nichicon extensively in switchers. Even Rubycon, maker of the lowest of the low grade garbage in days gone by now has some decent product. Siemens made a lot of electrolytic crapacitors.

I originally missed the TS's remark about these being in a monitor. I think it is very likely that the capacitors shown have failed because the main filter caps on the output(s) of the switcher (assumed, but I'd be extremely surprised if it were otherwise) that runs the board have "worn out." This results in shifting of ripple current from where it should be in supply filter caps to the local capacitors in the powered circuitry. A flyback converter is typically what is used to power a monitor (even though there is nothing flying back, as in the old days). When the output caps fail, some of the energy that should go into the output during the switch OFF time can get dumped into the "primary" side of the switcher which can result in switch (almost always a FET) failure. However, I've repaired a few monitors where the switch was fine and all that was required was a handful of new caps. Fortunately monitor boards are rarely multilayer, so getting the caps out isn't the nightmare it can be on multilayer boards.
 
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