places to learn electronics skills?

Thread Starter

Th3RadMan

Joined Jun 13, 2016
5
I am starting to get interested in electronic systems and how to understand/make them. I want to learn more, but just looking at random schematics randomly has pretty much taught me everything they can. How can I learn more without having to take actual classes (college schedule ftw).
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
11,230
How can I learn more without having to take actual classes (college schedule ftw).
This isn't what you want to hear but, by avoiding the most obvious way to learn you may setting yourself up for a lot of frustration. Self teaching works for a lot of things, but electronics isn't one of them.
 

hp1729

Joined Nov 23, 2015
2,304
I am starting to get interested in electronic systems and how to understand/make them. I want to learn more, but just looking at random schematics randomly has pretty much taught me everything they can. How can I learn more without having to take actual classes (college schedule ftw).
Self study is difficult but you get the education you specifically want. College gets you a general education, most of which you will probably never use. Are you military age? consider schools in the military. Choose Air Force or Navy over ground forces.
For self study you are in the right place ,,, search for it here. Get specific about what you want to learn and search for it. There are few questions that have not been answered already.
 

Thread Starter

Th3RadMan

Joined Jun 13, 2016
5
I'm already studying to become a mechanical engineer and my college doesn't offer classes for EE unless it's your major, not that I would want to take another class that I don't need for the price of tuition. I never would touch anything military related either ;).

As for looking at random schematics, I now have a very basic understanding why "this part in the system does this". I just want to experiment and learn why this does that in this.
 

ClassOfZero

Joined Dec 28, 2016
114
I'm already studying to become a mechanical engineer and my college doesn't offer classes for EE unless it's your major, not that I would want to take another class that I don't need for the price of tuition. I never would touch anything military related either ;).

As for looking at random schematics, I now have a very basic understanding why "this part in the system does this". I just want to experiment and learn why this does that in this.
Well, going by what you said I see no need in delaying starting some practical experimentation.

Have you had a look at the talking electronics site I linked to ? There's a whole lot info there, and the downloadable magazines are a great source of info, mainly from a practical point of view.

But you really need to dive in and get your hands dirty.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
11,230
As the OP claims to be able to understand schematics, it would appear the OP is quite talented.
There's a difference between being able to read a schematic and understanding the intent and trade offs involved versus copying the work of others. How can you judge a design to be good or bad? I've seen a lot of bad schematics posted on the internet...

This is even difficult for EE students. If it was that easy, everyone would be an EE.
 

hp1729

Joined Nov 23, 2015
2,304
There's a difference between being able to read a schematic and understanding the intent and trade offs involved versus copying the work of others. How can you judge a design to be good or bad? I've seen a lot of bad schematics posted on the internet...

This is even difficult for EE students. If it was that easy, everyone would be an EE.
An important difference. I, as a technician, can follow a schematic, but an engineer has a more in depth understanding of the parts and the circuit. What are the OP's goals is the question.
 

Thread Starter

Th3RadMan

Joined Jun 13, 2016
5
my realistic goal is to be able to read a schematic and kinda get why certain components are where they are. My unrealistic goal (at least without taking EE classes or something equivalent is to really understand, and be able to create my own circuits. I guess I'll start off with kits, since working with my hands helps me learn a lot faster. I learned that recently when I designed and built a subwoofer for my room.
 
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