pendulum g force

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
21,259
The simple relationship is:

\( \omega\;=\;\sqrt{\cfrac{g}{l}} \)

You can plug in the correct numbers with the correct units to confirm this. Since the intended units are not specified you will have some additional detective work to figure out what they are. Can you manage this?
 

Ian0

Joined Aug 7, 2020
10,022
Mabee I am understanding this pendulum calculator incorrectly. Is this calculator saying if I move a pendulum at a rate of 500 times per second (500hz) the pendulum would experience a gforce of 127,815 G's?
No - it's telling you a pendulum experiencing an acceleration due to gravity of 127815 <whatever units you specified> of the length you specified would oscillate at 500Hz.
 

BobTPH

Joined Jun 5, 2013
9,138
Seeing as the acceleration due to gravity on the surface if the sun is only 30g, I think you will need a neutron star or black hole to verify this experimentally.
 

MrAl

Joined Jun 17, 2014
11,565
Mabee I am understanding this pendulum calculator incorrectly. Is this calculator saying if I move a pendulum at a rate of 500 times per second (500hz) the pendulum would experience a gforce of 127,815 G's?
Wow 500 times per second. What is the mass of the pendulum?
I could hardly imagine a child swinging back and forth on a swing set that fast (ha ha).

I almost hate to bring this up but the pendulum is not 'quite' as simple as it seems when you look up formulas on the web. There is a nonlinear component that introduces a small error whereas most of the formulas we run into on the web do not include this. It's very interesting i can post more if interested. This phenomenon can be used to test formulas for the numerical solution of differential equations.
 
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