New email scam, old twist, insufficient address info, clarify and schedule delivery.

Thread Starter

killivolt

Joined Jan 10, 2010
829
I almost blundered, I literally was at the point of sale just add your card right? Wrong, WTF what am I doing I said?

As a result I was still asleep not functioning luckily my senses kicked, when it comes to money your going to have to squeeze hard not a simple $2 charge to deliver is absurd.
Hotlink
The scammers send an official-looking email complete with US Postal Service logos that say you have a package that can’t be delivered because of an insufficient address. Next they ask for a small amount of money to “re-deliver” your package. Then they’ll ask for credit card information – after that has been entered, a screen will pop up, asking for your date of birth and social security number to “verify and protect” your identity.
If I can be that easily deceived as trained Network Admin then how is anyone, I mean others those not in IT.

I’ve understood those folks are the secretaries and such. Sometimes I’m so arrogant to think thank god someone is there to assist them? Wrong again. We are all fools when we put our faith in our eyes, in IT I can shout to another guy in the room with issues to us related to the Network BackBone Security, we hit our self check and forget poor Linda in Purchasing who clicked the bated webpage directly from there.………..most in this room would agree, not me syndrome, I’m not that stupid, wrong again, it’s all of us.

Anyone else almost give away there back account? Fake Website exactly looks the same in my mind………I’m such a fool. (Fool and his money quote)



kv
 
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BobTPH

Joined Jun 5, 2013
5,453
The Democratic National Committee emails were stolen by someone responding to an email saying he needed to change his password, and providing a link to do so.

Never respond to an unsolicited email requesting information.
 

Thread Starter

killivolt

Joined Jan 10, 2010
829
The Democratic National Committee emails were stolen by someone responding to an email saying he needed to change his password, and providing a link to do so.

Never respond to an unsolicited email requesting information.
Exactly for offering that data point.


kv
 

djsfantasi

Joined Apr 11, 2010
8,442
I always forward suspicious emails messages. But I never type anything nor actually send the message, just look at the headers in the forwarded message. They will appear without any aliasing.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
14,897
I got one of those this morning. *Fedex* not Fedex wants to deliver my new Iphone if only I would pay a small fee.
I got one this morning about my iphone13. I didn't even bother viewing the raw message source.

I've been getting a lot of SPAM about credit cards being locked or my McAfee license expiring. The people who fall for those ploys must be absolute idiots.
 

djsfantasi

Joined Apr 11, 2010
8,442
Here is an example of an email I received “confirming” my recent McAffee anti-virus purchase when I started to forward it. Look at the email addresses.
B496ACA4-CCF3-46EF-B0BD-A46C654AA1FC.png
 
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SamR

Joined Mar 19, 2019
4,334
Yup, I get at least a dozen every day. Last few weeks they are using different women's names and these are not the mail order brides from Ukraine ones. When in doubt click on the sender's name to see who it is really from. Got one this morning that my purchase did not go through and wanted me to verify my CC#! Yeah, I'll do that right away... Even got one from my "ISP" that I needed to reaffirm my account information. Never underestimate the ignorance of many computer owners. Ever since WalMart started selling computers to Bubba things have gone downhill...
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boostbuck

Joined Oct 5, 2017
221
If I can be that easily deceived as trained Network Admin then how is anyone, I mean others those not in IT
I've been in IT since COBOL on a B3600 AND I'm paranoid about security, and I got caught - I was expecting a failed transaction on an expired Credit Card, and the notification arrived, so I went ahead and keyed all the details in, only just realised at the last page. By chance the scammers had sent me almost exactly what I was expecting. I had to cancel my card in a hurry, and listen to a lecture on security from the bank (grrrrrr.... but I deserved it).

I don't know how people without an IT background survive - really it's all too complicated.
 
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