Need Help Determining Stepper Motor Voltage

Thread Starter

Best_Intentions

Joined Jun 13, 2016
10
Hi,

This is my first post on All About Circuits so if I have posted this question in the wrong forum please feel free to correct me.

My question is with regards to a stepper motor I have in my possession. It is made by Lin Engineering (or at least marketed by them) and has the following identifiers and specs. I am hoping that someone can supply the operating voltage of this motor. Lin Engineering does not list this specific motor. Any help would be appreciated.

Motor Model: 5704X-03P-01

NEMA 23 Body

Wiring: Bipolar (4-Conductor)

Amperage: 3.60

Step Angle: 0.45 degrees

75 oz. of holding torque.
 

Sensacell

Joined Jun 19, 2012
2,450
Note that the rated voltage and current are for DC operation. It would perform rather poorly at the rating listed on the nameplate.

Most current regulated stepper drives use far higher voltages than the motor nameplate suggests...

How do you intent to drive the motor?
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
19,058
The bottom line when using it with a PWM controller for e.g. that operates with a higher DC voltage is that the name plate Current of the motor is not exceeded.
Modern stepper controllers are designed to maintain this value over the rpm range.
Max.
 

Thread Starter

Best_Intentions

Joined Jun 13, 2016
10
Thanks much for all replies. Since the nameplate shows 3.6 amps and one of the windings shows a resistance of 1.1 ohms I would have thought that a 36 volt power source would drive this motor. But after reading Sensacell's reply I think this motor would need higher voltages driving it to gain good performance.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
19,058
The bottom line is the name plate current should NOT be exceeded, the reason for the high PS voltage is that if the drive is designed simply for this current as the rpm increases so does the inductive reactance of the motor coil and current drops, therefore in order to provide the correct current as the rpm increases, a high voltage is applied accordingly to keep current constant.,
The old method was simply to use a series resistor and a voltage calculated to provide the rated current, now modern drives use PWM as a more efficient method.
Read any of the technical papers from any of the large stepper motor manuf. and they usually explain the reason for this torque loss with rpm, if no steps are taken.
BTW, the static full torque voltage will be at 3.96vdc.
Max.
 

Marley

Joined Apr 4, 2016
279
I agree. Modern stepper motor drivers use PWM to control the motor current from a much higher voltage. Often 48V or more. A high voltage allows a quick change in winding current and allows the motor to deliver more torque at higher speeds.

Basically, each motor winding becomes part of a switchmode voltage dropper where the winding itself is the energy storage inductor. So even if the winding current is 3.60A (for example) the average current taken from the supply is much less.

A resistor could be used but will be very wasteful of power.
 
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