Learning electronics in a systematic way

Thread Starter

Robsim

Joined Sep 6, 2016
13
Hi, i have a Bachelor college degree in mechanical engineering. I want to have an in depth knowledge of electronics, but i prefer to do self study, I want to learn electronics in a systematic way. I have have some basic knowledge about resistors capacitors, transistors, AC DC voltage. I have a home lab with oscilloscope, power supplies, signal generator etc. i can work with LT spice. I have books from Floyd, Electronic devices 9th edition, John Bird, Electrical and electronic Principles and technology 3th edition etc. I want to study analog circuits for now and later digital. I want to control electric motors etc. I don't want to tinker. I'm serious about it. What i need is a program. If there are college teachers who teach electronics and reading this, please help me with a course program and recommend online free downloadable books so i can systematically learn. For example, see chapter 2 of this book and chapter 5 of that book. Many thanks
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
9,985
2c

By having a Bachelor college degree in mechanical engineering you know the power of structured education. If you're really serious about it then some sort of formal education is what I would recommend.
 

MrSalts

Joined Apr 2, 2020
1,832
Hi, i have a Bachelor college degree in mechanical engineering. I want to have an in depth knowledge of electronics, but i prefer to do self study, I want to learn electronics in a systematic way. I have have some basic knowledge about resistors capacitors, transistors, AC DC voltage. I have a home lab with oscilloscope, power supplies, signal generator etc. i can work with LT spice. I have books from Floyd, Electronic devices 9th edition, John Bird, Electrical and electronic Principles and technology 3th edition etc. I want to study analog circuits for now and later digital. I want to control electric motors etc. I don't want to tinker. I'm serious about it. What i need is a program. If there are college teachers who teach electronics and reading this, please help me with a course program and recommend online free downloadable books so i can systematically learn. For example, see chapter 2 of this book and chapter 5 of that book. Many thanks
Some fine people at this site recreated a wheel of sorts right here with a range of short course topics. Go to the main ACC page and I think there is a link there. Otherwise, there are plenty of EE programs at engineering schools that show the list of required classes to get an EE degree and you can find the syllabi for all of those classes and slog through.
 

MrSalts

Joined Apr 2, 2020
1,832
If you've taught yourself how to learn, then you may as well continue. I have shared an apartment with a young engineering professor at a top 25 university - I'd say you might be ahead and save yourself some cash if you can find a structure with some course outlines and focus. On the other hand, if you need to prove to a future employer that you can do EE work, you might want to sign up for the classes and get your paper.
 

Thread Starter

Robsim

Joined Sep 6, 2016
13
If you've taught yourself how to learn, then you may as well continue. I have shared an apartment with a young engineering professor at a top 25 university - I'd say you might be ahead and save yourself some cash if you can find a structure with some course outlines and focus. On the other hand, if you need to prove to a future employer that you can do EE work, you might want to sign up for the classes and get your paper.
Yes i can learn by myself. Taught myself that long ago. The problem is what is necessary and what's not. You're right. What i need is a structure with some course outlines and focus. Thanks
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
9,985
Yes i can learn by myself. Taught myself that long ago. The problem is what is necessary and what's not. You're right. What i need is a structure with some course outlines and focus. Thanks
Exactly. Electronics is a technology, not a science. The basic technical calculations are mainly rote math equivalents of mass, inertia, storage and forces you're familiar with. The 'Art of electronics' requires a deeper understanding of the underlying physics those equations don't explain in simplified circuit theory. That means reading and studying a lot of information that's not directly related to electronics in the field of electrical science to understand how electromagnetic energy moves things like motors and how energy flows across space.

You have a big head-start because electrical science is modeled on mechanical energy domains concepts today but that doesn't mean there are direct mechanical analogs between them.
 

Thread Starter

Robsim

Joined Sep 6, 2016
13
Exactly. Electronics is a technology, not a science. The basic technical calculations are mainly rote math equivalents of mass, inertia, storage and forces you're familiar with. The 'Art of electronics' requires a deeper understanding of the underlying physics those equations don't explain in simplified circuit theory. That means reading and studying a lot of information that's not directly related to electronics in the field of electrical science to understand how electromagnetic energy moves things like motors and how energy flows across space.

You have a big head-start because electrical science is modeled on mechanical energy domains concepts today but that doesn't mean there are direct mechanical analogs between them.
Thanks you. Yes there are plenty of direct mechanical analogs between them. Hydraulic systems are part of mechanical engineering. Check valves for example work the same as diodes. So if you know how hydraulic systems work it's more easy to understand how electronic systems work and vice versa. Problem is what do i need and what not.
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
9,985
Thanks you. Yes there are plenty of direct mechanical analogs between them. Hydraulic systems are part of mechanical engineering. Check valves for example work the same as diodes. So if you know how hydraulic systems work it's more easy to understand how electronic systems work and vice versa. Problem is what do i need and what not.
You need to know enough to be able to understand everything related to the basic technology.

You should review the Navy NEETS course to get an idea of what you need.
https://www.hnsa.org/manuals-documents/2575-2/
By enrolling in this self-study course, you have demonstrated a desire to improve yourself and the Navy. Remember, however, this self-study course is only one part of the total Navy training program. Practical experience, schools, selected reading, and your desire to succeed are also necessary to successfully round out a fully meaningful training program.
The series is designed to give small amounts of information that can be easily digested before advancing further into the more complex material. For a student just becoming acquainted with electricity or electronics, it is highly recommended that the modules be studied in their suggested sequence. While there is a listing of NEETS by module title, the following brief descriptions give a quick overview of how the individual modules flow together.
 
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