LCR Pro1 Plus

Thread Starter

bob2

Joined Jun 15, 2019
141
As I have already said, there is no need to memorize the marking of resistors. The device copes well with this on its own.
0.6 Ohm.jpg
 

rsjsouza

Joined Apr 21, 2014
211
Please indicate the required values on the diagram, I will try to make this diagram on the layout. Let's see what the LCR meter shows.
The circuit I mentioned is very generic; any two-stage transistor audio amplifier circuit will have a similar configuration and the resistors will be in the order of a few kΩ, while the capacitors will be from 1 to 100µF depending on the stage.

Also, the automatic part identification is not fail proof as well. For example, if you are testing a wirewound resistor of very low value but at a higher frequency (100kHz, for example), its inductance can be predominant and thus make the tester show the part as an inductor. Conversely, when testing a small inductor but with low frequency it will show as a resistor. These results are not wrong at all, given the intrinsic physical properties of the part change with frequency.

All in all, this is an excellent tester but, just like with anything else in the test world, a thorough understanding of the circuit being tested is indispensible.

Good luck with your job!
 

Thread Starter

bob2

Joined Jun 15, 2019
141
All in all, this is an excellent tester but, just like with anything else in the test world, a thorough understanding of the circuit being tested is indispensible.

Good luck with your job!
Yes, you are absolutely right. The main thing in our work is the head. So it has been and always will be, even after 100 years.
Now on my desktop all the necessary devices are located in this order.
1. Multimeter.
2. Oscilloscope.
3. Power supply.
4. Discharge for capacitors.
4.LCR Pro1 Plus.
5. Soldering iron.
Good luck with your job!
 

rsjsouza

Joined Apr 21, 2014
211
I have a LCR meter (not as nice as yours - it is a Reed 5001) but it is one of my most used pieces of equipment. I do a lot of repairs and have accumulated and inherited a reasonable number of parts which demand categorization and test (out of circuit :) ) Over the years I learned a lot about the frequency response with this very simple LCR, and maybe someday I will be able to afford a Sencore, a VNA, a SpecAn...
 

Thread Starter

bob2

Joined Jun 15, 2019
141
I have a LCR meter (not as nice as yours - it is a Reed 5001) but it is one of my most used pieces of equipment.
Yes, this is a good workhorse.
It is difficult to work without a simple LCR meter. But you can measure the inductance or wind the coil, but you can’t check its quality (Rs, Q). We need an impedance meter.
 

rsjsouza

Joined Apr 21, 2014
211
The user manuals R5001 says the opposite:
Ls / Lp / Cs / Cp with D / Q / θ / ESR parameters
Oh, I thought the LCR Pro1 Plus could read all that. In this case my 5001 is indeed more equipped as I usually measure Q (inductors) and D (capacitors).

The DER EE DE-5000 is also a good impedance meter, with the advantage of having true 4-wire measurements. Although the 5001 can be zeroed to overcome the lead resistance as well.
 

Thread Starter

bob2

Joined Jun 15, 2019
141
I tried to measure different inductors and resistors in the circuit. The results are positive. I did not notice any special influence of the test voltage.
 

Attachments

SHA_S

Joined Jun 20, 2019
15
Inductance is nice, but I wonder how stable the secondary parameter is? Because the video presentation of this tweezers with him was just a disaster. As in the case of inductance, the spread reached 0.4%, and in the case of capacitance, the spread reached 296%!
Repeating my first question.
What losses does this tweezers demonstrate in ceramic capacitors of a small capacity (1-4 pF) at a frequency of 10 kHz?
 

Deep_Blue

Joined Jun 30, 2019
1
For in circuit measurement, it is better to use 0.2Vrms instead of 0.5Vrms to avoid possible incorrect reading due to PN junction activation. The forward voltage can go below 0.5V for lots of PN junctions, such as schottky diodes, ESD protection diodes built in semiconductors, etc.
Please note the test voltage of an LCR meter is a sinusoidal wave. 0.2Vrms has peak voltage 0.28V (0.2Vrms*1.4) and 0.5Vrms has peak voltage 0.7Vrms (0.5Vrms*1.4). It doesn't matter if you measure standalone components. But if you measure a component that is connected to a schottky diode or a semiconductor pin that has built in ESD protection diode, I suggest you using 0.2Vrms test voltage. If you use 0.5Vrms test voltage, it may to activate the diode and get incorrect reading.
 

Thread Starter

bob2

Joined Jun 15, 2019
141
Please note the test voltage of an LCR meter is a sinusoidal wave. 0.2Vrms has peak voltage 0.28V (0.2Vrms*1.4) and 0.5Vrms has peak voltage 0.7Vrms (0.5Vrms*1.4).
Yes, it is written in the manual. I saw it.
Could you show part of the diagram where I could find the difference?
 

Thread Starter

bob2

Joined Jun 15, 2019
141
The forward voltage can go below 0.5V for lots of PN junctions, such as schottky diodes, ESD protection diodes built in semiconductors, etc.
You have done scrupulous research in this direction, how will the Schottky diodes behave in different situations?
 

SHA_S

Joined Jun 20, 2019
15
bob2, but in the case there is something to say?
I repeat my first question again.
What losses does this tweezers demonstrate in ceramic capacitors of a small capacity (1-4 pF) at a frequency of 10 kHz?

P.S. Maybe it's time to return to your topic on a famous forum? :)
 

lotusmoon

Joined Jun 14, 2013
214
Hi all.
Yesterday I received this meter of electronic components. I began to study his work. Everything seemed to be fine and expected, even better than I thought.
But there is no large experience of measurements directly in circuit. Therefore, I decided to ask a question on the forum.
In measurements in circuit, you can use a voltage of 0.5 volts or only 0.2 volts?
Indeed, as is known, the accuracy of the measurement depends on the magnitude of the voltage.
 

BR-549

Joined Sep 22, 2013
4,938
I don't use the orange format. I use the blue format. Select the forum that you want to post in. At the top right side.....radio button....post new thread.
 
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