Latching Relay

Thread Starter

25Raydo00

Joined Jul 30, 2019
12
Hey guys, I stumbled upon this latching relay around the house.
It is a "S89R11DBD1-12"
small swtich on the side "v7-1C17e9"
Common sense tells me the blue is coil
Red is common. would that be my ground?
and I'm assuming the green is my normal on normal off?
I noticed it says 12V 15 amp but also 125 and 250 AC.

I created a post a while back looking for information on how to turn a momentary switch to a toggle but haven't gotten around to it due to work and trying to understand the diagrams. Would I be able to use this switch to control the switch functions on two other relays? the two other relays are powering 2 12V 8amp lights each. I am using this system to turn a factory momentary button into an on and off switch. So I want my momentary switch to be able to turn my system on and of by the press of a button. I was speaking with a friend and he thinks this may require a bit of amps to move the coil. I have not yet tested it. I would assume if it worked I would control this with an additional relay.
If there is a much more simple way to do this I would appreciate any advice. I am still trying to learn with this type of stuff. I would rather not start out by building one from scratch. Maybe there is a smaller type of latching relay that will work?
relay.JPG
relay2.jpg
 

Yaakov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
3,161
The coil is 12VDC. The switches can handle 15A or .5HP at 125 and 250VAC.

The switches are two standard “snap action switching units” with bent tab as common and one each of the others as NO and NC. You just need to check the terminals with a continuity tester.
 

Thread Starter

25Raydo00

Joined Jul 30, 2019
12
The coil is 12VDC. The switches can handle 15A or .5HP at 125 and 250VAC.

The switches are two standard “snap action switching units” with bent tab as common and one each of the others as NO and NC. You just need to check the terminals with a continuity tester.
Thanks for the input. Does "NO" and "NC" typically have a definition one from the other? I guess I am asking what do they commonly mean.. I will check continuity after I get out of here.
 

eetech00

Joined Jun 8, 2013
2,364
That relay is a bistable impulse relay.
It requires a short pulse of a minimum duration to operate. It also requires a polarity reversal to the coil to change the state of the contacts.

probably more complicated than you want.
 

Yaakov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
3,161
That relay is a bistable impulse relay.
It requires a short pulse of a minimum duration to operate. It also requires a polarity reversal to the coil to change the state of the contacts.

probably more complicated than you want.
Yes, it is an impulse relay which, according to the datasheet will operate on a 75mS pulse, but it has a continuous duty rated coil so the pulse can be longer with no problem, and the cam is rotary, it doesn't require polarity reversal. I am not sure why you think that but impulses relays specifically respond to an impulse without respect to the current state of the relay and switch to the other state.

You can see the shape of the actuator and how it operates in this datasheet: S89 90_DS.pdf
 

eetech00

Joined Jun 8, 2013
2,364
Yes, it is an impulse relay which, according to the datasheet will operate on a 75mS pulse, but it has a continuous duty rated coil so the pulse can be longer with no problem, and the cam is rotary, it doesn't require polarity reversal. I am not sure why you think that but impulses relays specifically respond to an impulse without respect to the current state of the relay and switch to the other state.

You can see the shape of the actuator and how it operates in this datasheet: S89 90_DS.pdf
yes...missed that.
Changes state at each impulse..
 
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