Laptop charger as amplifier power supply

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PaPiャSly

Joined Dec 25, 2022
47
So im using this 19v 4.74A laptop charger to power my amplifier which is rated for 12-24v 5a but my concern is if there's a difference between a laptop charger and a a proper 24v power supply and i might be damaging my ampli in the long runIMG_20221229_154404.jpg
 
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dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
16,732
my concern is if there's a difference between a laptop charger and a a proper 24v power supply and i might be damaging my ampli in the long run
I'd be more concerned about it being rated at a current lower than what the amplifier specifies.
 

ronsimpson

Joined Oct 7, 2019
2,904
I use them on all kinds of projects.
Most audio amplifiers use very little power when the volume is down.
4.74 is almost 5A.
If you use the lowest resistance speakers (2 ohm) and pound the base so the neighbors can hear, maybe you will use the full power. Without knowing much more about the amplifier we can't know what the current might be.
 

Audioguru again

Joined Oct 21, 2019
6,620
"For use with information technology equipment only" printed on it.
Because an amplifier makes a huge squealing noise when powered from it? Because it causes an amplifier to produce swearing?
 

BobTPH

Joined Jun 5, 2013
8,686
It is almost certainly a bridged class D amp. At 19V, the most current you can get into an 8Ω speaker is 2.3A, 4.6 for stereo. real power usage for music will not be anywhere near that high, so, if you stick to 8Ω speakers, you should be okay.
 

Audioguru again

Joined Oct 21, 2019
6,620
If an amplifier volume control is turned up too high so that it is clipping or if you play acid rock noises (same problem) then the amplifier current can be double its rating and cause this 19V, 4.74A (90W) rated power supply to catch on fire.
 

Jon Chandler

Joined Jun 12, 2008
1,000
If an amplifier volume control is turned up too high so that it is clipping or if you play acid rock noises (same problem) then the amplifier current can be double its rating and cause this 19V, 4.74A (90W) rated power supply to catch on fire.


The switching power supplies I have tested have shown a remarkable self-preservation instinct. When their rated current is exceeded, the voltage falls remarkably. Sorry, no fire, flames, smoke or damage.
 

Jon Chandler

Joined Jun 12, 2008
1,000
I've used many power supplies stating that without problems. If you claim they will catch fire, please provide some evidence of your wildly inaccurate claim.
 

ericgibbs

Joined Jan 29, 2010
18,668
Then why do they say, " For use with information technology equipment only"?
Hi agu,
It just makes the buyer think he's getting more for his money. ie: eye Candy.

As Sigmund said: sometimes a PSU is just a PSU.
Surprised you fell for that one.;)

E
Edited.
 
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