Is this a suitable speed controller for a 2.94A blower fan connected to a battery?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Crap Elite, Feb 12, 2018.

  1. Crap Elite

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 12, 2018
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    Hi guys,

    I am a noob when it comes to electronics so I am seeking help from the experts here.

    I have a Delta BFB1012EH PWM blower 1U 2U server dedicated turbofan 9733 97x97x33mm 9.7cm 12V 2.94A which has 4 cables (red black blue yellow) connected to a DC 12V 3000mAh Li-ion Super Rechargeable Battery Pack and running well but its a little too loud and fast.

    I want to dial back the speed and am thinking of this controller.(WALFRONT PWM DC 6-28V 3A Motor Speed Controller Regulator Adjustable Variable Speed Control Switch Fan DC Motor Governor Tools)
    Description:
    This DC Motor Speed Controller allows controlling the direction of a DC motor using a Pulse-- Width-Modulated (PWM) DC voltage with a Duty Cycle fully adjustable from 0%-100%.
    The motor speed controller can easily provide a continuous current of 3A to your DC motor or other DC load.
    Main technical parameters:
    - Input supply voltage:6V-28VDC
    - The maximum output power: 80W
    - The maximum continuous output current :3A
    - Duty Cycle adjustable:5%-100%

    -Size: (L*W) 5cm*3.2cm

    Quantity:1PC

    Operating instruction:
    1. Connect your DC motor (or DC load) to the motor terminals as indicated on the wiring diagram.
    2. Connect a voltage of 10V-36V DC to the circuit making sure of the correct polarity of the connection. Note that the voltage applied to the motor will be supply voltage applied to the circuit. It is recommended to add an appropriately rated fuse inline with the positive supply in order to protect the circuit from any possible short circuits.
    3. You can now control the speed of the motor through potentiometer.
    Package included:
    1 x DC 6V - 28V 3A PWM Motor Speed Variable Regulator Controller Switch

    Do you think this controller switch is suitable for my use? It is 3A vs the 2.94A of the blower fan, would it cope or would it blow?

    And why are there 4 connectors here? Do i need to just connect the yellow and blue here? Never used one of these before!

    Thanks guys!
     
  2. AlbertHall

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jun 4, 2014
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    The data sheets I can find for this blower say it has 3 wires. Can you confirm the part number, please.
     
  3. MisterBill2

    Distinguished Member

    Jan 23, 2018
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    Connecting a blower motor with a listed current draw of 2.94 amps to a controller listed with a maximum load current of 3 amps is not something I would do, because the starting amps of the motor will probably exceed the 3 amp limit and that will cause problems. If you wish to drive the blower at a lower speed, try connecting it to a 5 volt supply connection. If you have already run the blower motor then you must know which of those four wires are for the power, those would be the ones to connect to the five volt supply.
     
  4. Alec_t

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 17, 2013
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    What are the black and yellow wires on the fan for? If one is for a PWM input, the PWM signal would probably just be smoothed by a capacitor inside the fan, so the input should be equally happy just receiving a DC voltage. If that's an option then a simple pot across the 12V supply might suffice for speed control.
     
  5. Crap Elite

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 12, 2018
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  6. Crap Elite

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 12, 2018
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    Red and black wires running to power... and I assume blue and white is for speed control?

    So meaning the switch i mentioned above is an overkill?
     
  7. Crap Elite

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 12, 2018
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    I notice the fan has a slow start when connected to my battery before it goes to full RPMs.

    Can you link me to a 5v supply connection?

    So do you mean what I mentioned above isn't suitable? I see it is rated for 6 - 28v.
     
  8. Alec_t

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 17, 2013
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    The fans in that pdf have only two wires and are rated for a 7V-12.6V supply. Wrong datasheet? :confused:
     
  9. MisterBill2

    Distinguished Member

    Jan 23, 2018
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    The color code for the 5 volts lines is often printed on the computer power supply case label. Usually, on a normal supply, the 5 volts positive is the red wires and the common is the black wires.
     
  10. Tonyr1084

    Distinguished Member

    Sep 24, 2015
    3,075
    746
    The data sheet provided by the thread starter suggests there's only two wires, not four.

    The thread starter was referring to the power input capabilities of the fan speed controller he's considering using.

    What I gather from your data sheet the fan produces 62 DB of sound. Not exactly quiet, but if you PWM(odulate) the power to the fan and slow it down you'll also reduce the noise.

    The top wire terminal (marked "IN") is for your power (negative) lead. Lets call that pin 1. Pins 2, 3 & 4 are the next and next and last pins. Pin 2 is power (positive) in; pin 3 and 4 are the fan out. If you connect the fan one way the fan will run one way. If it's the wrong way then just reverse the pins on pins 3 & 4.

    You say your fan has Red, Black, Blue & Yellow. Well, I don't know what the Blue and Yellow are for. If you operate the fan just using the red and black wires then isolate those other two wires. Don't let them touch anything and don't short them together.

    But I would suggest you understand exactly what those wires are for. They might actually be different speeds for the fan. Say (and this is just guess work) the black is negative; red is full power, blue is medium power and yellow is low power. BUT THIS IS JUST GUESSWORK. That's why I suggest you determine exactly what they are for. Cars (old models) have fans with just two wires. They use high wattage resistors to control their speeds. Newer cars might have (since I've not messed with fans from cars in many years) different speeds are controlled by which wire is powered. If so - then you shouldn't try to power the fan on more than one speed at a time. In other words, don't think that combining high and medium will work, probably will lock up the motor, and potentially burn something out. So figure out what those wires are for. Or don't use them at all.

    [edit] your specs show the BFB1012EH twice, and the specs are different. One model is a rev -C while the other is a rev -A. Which fan are you working with? And as Albert Hall asked, are you sure you have the correct numbers? Correct spec sheet(s)? None on the spec sheet state four leads; only two.
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2018
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