inverter with 555 timer

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by GUPTA ANIRUDDHA, Sep 21, 2017.

  1. GUPTA ANIRUDDHA

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 21, 2017
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    Does anyone has the hardware cicuit of inverter with 555 timer
     
  2. Alec_t

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 17, 2013
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    Ask Google.
     
    shortbus likes this.
  3. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
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    Here's one I had looked at. Never got around to building it.
     
  4. Reloadron

    Distinguished Member

    Jan 15, 2015
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    You have started several threads on this topic or along the lines of building a UPS. Something you need to consider is most of the simple circuits where a transistor pair is used driven by an oscillator output are not going to give you much current. Should you wish high current from an inverter you should look at high current inverter designs and in most cases it is easier and less expensive to simply buy an inverter or UPS off the shelf. Just something to consider.

    Ron
     
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  5. Audioguru

    Expert

    Dec 20, 2007
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    The simple 555 inverter has a squarewave output that many electronic appliances cannot use and it has horrible voltage regulation.
     
  6. Dodgydave

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jun 22, 2012
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    Ditch the 555 and use a TL494.
     
  7. GUPTA ANIRUDDHA

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 21, 2017
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    cant i build ups with the simple inverter?
     
  8. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
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    That depends entirely on what you need to power, which you have not specified. The simple circuit such as the one I showed is unlikely to support more than 1W at the AC load.

    The end-to-end design also matters. By that I mean you have to define what you mean by UPS. If you need a power supply that supplies a smooth sine wave continuously if the mains power lines go down, that's very different from a low-power supply to run a small load such as a radio off a car battery.

    What are you hoping to accomplish? As already noted, its almost certainly cheaper to buy a commercial solution than to build one yourself.
     
  9. Reloadron

    Distinguished Member

    Jan 15, 2015
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    I guess that all depends on how we define simple. You build a UPS based on what the power demand will be. Most people who want for example a 1,000 watt (True Power) discover it is easier to buy than build. There is also a matter of the waveform one expects. Most relatively crude UPS units output a MSW (Modified Sine Wave) and the higher end units output a TSW (True Sine Wave) so that is a consideration, here is an example. I see Wayneh has weighed in as I type. So the needed power is a very big consideration. Also you may notice larger units also use 24 VDC verse 12 VDC and there is good reason. 1,000 watts, which is not much, at 12 VDC is about 84 amps and that does not take into account inefficiency so figure upwards of 100 amps draw on the DC supply while a 24 VDC supply reduces that by 1/2 to about 50 amps.

    Finally keeping all of your questions helps those wishing to help you better focused.
    <EDIT> Keeping all your questions in a single thread helps those wishing to help you better focused. </EDIT>

    Ron
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2017
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