Indoor propane heaters...

Discussion in 'General Science' started by Externet, Apr 2, 2018.

  1. Externet

    Thread Starter AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 29, 2005
    1,190
    129
    Hi.
    Why are these heaters allowed for indoors use; what are the gases product of the propane combustion ? How do they work ?
    Planning to get one as emergency heater in the event of electrical power outages, and curious about them.

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  2. dl324

    AAC Fanatic!

    Mar 30, 2015
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    1,607
    I don't think that type of heater is allowed indoors (as in a home). You need one like Mr. Heater that has an O2 sensor. Even those are only certified for intermittent use and you aren't supposed to use any tank larger than 1 pound.

    I have this one:
    upload_2018-4-2_7-59-33.png
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  3. BR-549

    Distinguished Member

    Sep 22, 2013
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    Have you ever used natural gas for cooking at home? It's the same thing. Adjust air fuel mixture for blue flame.

    Yellow flame for CO.

    You can used kerosene too indoors.....that's what we use for backup.
     
  4. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
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    I would also worry about carbon monoxide along with a lack of oxygen.
    Apparently catalytic heaters, which the above appear to be, are safer than open flame type heaters.
    But any you use should be rated for indoor use.
    I would not use one without a carbon monoxide detector (one with battery backup if used during a power outage) as well as an oxygen sensor.
     
    RichardO and BR-549 like this.
  5. BR-549

    Distinguished Member

    Sep 22, 2013
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    crutschow is right, especially if you have a tight house. Houses don't breathe like they use to.
     
  6. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
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    I had a catalytic heater sold for camping, ie. for keeping your tent warm. I was super reluctant to use it for fear of CO. Until one very cold night. I decided to try it while I stayed awake until it got warm.

    Yeah that didn’t happen. I was out like a light. Both of us survived, so either the tent was very leaky or these things don’t make much CO.
     
  7. Zorac

    New Member

    Oct 9, 2016
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    Not likely an issue in a tent which is drafty, bit white gas is pretty bad for CO production though, unlike kerosene or propane. I wouldn't use white gas unless you are very very well ventilated, kerosene and propane you have much more leeway. like mentioned above, propane is like natural gas and you see both types of those stoves in houses without any extra venting although if you are burning a lot of it, venting will be required (eg, hot water tank or furnace).

    those coleman white gas catalytic heaters are only good for a tent or outside, not indoors. even in a tent i've heard of people getting light headed.
     
  8. DECELL

    Member

    Apr 23, 2018
    96
    19
    Look forwards to plenty of condensation.
     
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