I'm looking for somebody from Japan here :-)

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
13,418
:eek: ... interesting

and crazy. On the US base near Yokohama the locally generated power grid is 60hz for most military activities but in town it's 50hz on the national power grid.
http://www.powereng.com/projects/yokosuka-naval-station-power-system-upgrades/

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2011/07/19/reference/japans-incompatible-power-grids/#.XCaC1VVKjRY
To get back to your question, Japan’s bifurcated power system is a holdover from the 19th century, when early power ventures were small in scale and highly localized. In Tokyo, entrepreneurs who were already providing electric lighting in a limited area, using direct current, decided to expand their business by importing high-voltage alternating-current generators from Germany. The German equipment, purchased from the company that became AEG, worked on a frequency of 50 Hz. Meanwhile, the local power providers in Osaka brought in 60 Hz generators from the United States, supplied by the predecessor of General Electric Company. Surely no one was thinking about compatibility: Who then could have imagined that electric systems some 500 km apart might ever connect?
 

Thread Starter

Maciek Gromek

Joined May 8, 2017
72
ThanYou all very much, I actually knew these information about electricity in Japan, and my purpose was to talk about my "crazy" idea, to create in imagination the theoretical system to deliver.... American and European standard to one theoretical household (It sounds expensively, I know). The distribution You need to that, it's actually... the direct current, and it comes to favor nowadays with high voltage direct current distribution. From dirrect current I could get everything what I want (at least me, personally), because when You want to change for example from 60 to 50 hz frequency, You always need direct current first. So I can get single phase 120/240v 60 hz and 3-phase 230/400v 50 hz from the direct current to the one theoretical customer. Of course thanks to the inverters. But I know from history that direct current distribution can be not so effective as alternating curent, and this reminds me the system in Japan, where the net is mostly on AC but in the half of the country where You need to change the frequency there are the rectifiers for direct current to change from 50 to 60 hz and vice versa, and this is what I wanted to talk with the japanese electrician, but if You got some opinions please write. Regards
 

shortbus

Joined Sep 30, 2009
10,049
I for one don't understand why you are concerned with this. You ask about Japan but don't live there. and you want to make something for the Japanese market? Who if they thought it was marketable would be doing it themselves. But then again, I might be missing something, can you correct my thinking?
 

spinnaker

Joined Oct 29, 2009
7,830
I for one don't understand why you are concerned with this. You ask about Japan but don't live there. and you want to make something for the Japanese market? Who if they thought it was marketable would be doing it themselves. But then again, I might be missing something, can you correct my thinking?
It is not just you. ;)

Of course the run on paragraph doesn't help. ;)
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
28,761
The distribution You need to that, it's actually... the direct current, and it comes to favor nowadays with high voltage direct current distribution.....the system in Japan, where the net is mostly on AC but in the half of the country where
They may have switching methods for 50hz to 60 hz but I doubt they have DC distribution as they do in my home province, which is due to the many kilometers distance between the generating stations to the end users makes it much more efficient.
Max.
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
13,418
They may have switching methods for 50hz to 60 hz but I doubt they have DC distribution as they do in my home province, which is due to the many kilometers distance between the generating stations to the end users makes it much more efficient.
Max.
Correct, most of the HVDC lines are for back to back frequency conversion at the 50/60 Hz boundaries.
https://web.archive.org/web/2005111...80/cigresc14/Compendium/Shinshin Pictures.pdf

They do have several HVDC submarine cable links.
http://www.hitachi.com/ICSFiles/afieldfile/2004/06/08/r2001_03_111.pdf
 
Top