Identifying a part in a component

Discussion in 'Automotive Electronics' started by Binary Buddha, May 17, 2017.

  1. Binary Buddha

    Thread Starter Member

    Sep 24, 2016
    38
    0
    Can you guys help me identify that cylindrical resistor looking thing on this? The part is a blower motor resistor for a '97 Jeep Wrangler. I'm assuming that the coil elements are working and that the part I can't identify is what's acting up.
    20170318-DSC00355.jpg 20170318-DSC00357.jpg 20170318-DSC00360.jpg
     
  2. R!f@@

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 2, 2009
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    It's a temperature fuse
    From the picture I can see is 121°C. ( it ain't clear).
    That is the fuse threshold. Fuse opens if temp goes beyond that and needs to be replaced.
    Mind you. Soldering is not an option unless you got experience. I can solder those without destroying them. I dunno any other who can.
    You need to crimp a new one
     
  3. fourtytwo

    Member

    May 2, 2017
    25
    4
    You can solder them if you heatsink the lead on the fuse side of the solder joint, gripping the lead tightly in a pair of pliers and doing the soldering very quick usually works :)
     
  4. R!f@@

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 2, 2009
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    Not if you don't have experience.
     
  5. fourtytwo

    Member

    May 2, 2017
    25
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    of what, trying always to have the last word :)
     
  6. R!f@@

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 2, 2009
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    Experience in soldering on to components that are sensitive to heat.
    Whether you clamp a plier or not on to that fuse, if you take your time trying to solder wire to that, it will open. Period.
    Been there, Done that.

    I dunno what ur problem is but I hold onto what I said.
     
  7. Dodgydave

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jun 22, 2012
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    It's a Thermal Fuse.....looks like its crimped into the connector.



    RY-Micro-temp-font-b-fuses-b-font-Mini-font-b-thermal-b-font-font-b.jpg
     
  8. jkaiser20

    New Member

    Aug 9, 2016
    8
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    I think you missed where he said 'very quick'
     
  9. R!f@@

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 2, 2009
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    And you missed the part where I said "if you take your time trying to solder wire to that".
     
  10. SaleB

    New Member

    Jul 3, 2017
    8
    1
    You do not need to solder the thermal fuse to the ends. You can twist the ends of the fuse to the locations where the former element was connected and use some thin strip of steel to secure one wire to the other. I have used three methods, and these are, twisting tight one wire around the other; spot-welding (not soldering), a fantastic method if you have a spot welder at hand; crimping the wires together with a piece of a blade connector, like this part:
    upload_2017-7-3_19-28-30.png
    All of these methods are applicable. The resistor packs continue to work for many years. But spot welding is the best option, so if you have someone who works on battery cell replacement and has a spot welder at hand, it's the best option in my opinion
     
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