I wish to convert 27v input to 100v 1A output

Ian0

Joined Aug 7, 2020
3,752
Do you already have a power supply of >100V, or do you wish to convert the 27V input to 100V output? At how much current?
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
6,452
All this talk about converting a voltage - but nobody has said, or asked, if it's AC or DC voltage you want to convert. There are starkly differing methods for each.

FYI - 100V at 1 amp means 27V at 3.7 amps. And that's with 100% efficiency in converting from one to the other. And you NEVER get 100% efficiency; there's always a loss. 27V at 3.7A = 100W. And 100V at 1A = 100W. Again, that's at 100% efficiency. So depending on how much losses you have and depending on which method of converting 27 to 100 volts - you're going to need more than 3.7 amps at 27 volts.
 

Ian0

Joined Aug 7, 2020
3,752
All this talk about converting a voltage - but nobody has said, or asked, if it's AC or DC voltage you want to convert.
Nor what frequency, nor what accuracy!
I was assuming it was DC. For 50/60Hz AC, all it would need is a 110V primary, 30V secondary transformer used in reverse.
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
6,452
a great deal of explanation is required.
So true. But people sometimes use terms incorrectly. Just because WE know what an amplifier is - doesn't mean all people know. To me - an amplifier is something most often used with audio equipment. However, it can also be used in data transmission or other applications where a low current signal needs to be boosted. But a "Voltage Amplifier"? Well, it's possible we're still talking audio or some other frequency such as a radio transmitter. But if I look purely at the term "Voltage" I'm assuming (a dangerous thing to do) is changing one voltage into another.

As already stated: AC is transformed into a different voltage most often via a "Transformer". DC converters "Convert" the DC voltage into either another DC voltage OR into an AC voltage. Whereas rectifying an AC voltage into a DC voltage - that's most often done via a rectifier or a set of rectifiers. When going from AC to DC and incorporating filtering (a.k.a Capacitor) the resulting voltage will be higher because AC is most often tested at its RMS value. However, the peak voltage will be higher when rectified and filtered. 100 volts AC rectified to DC with a filter becomes 141.4 volts DC.

Now, depending on how much load is on the power supply (again assuming - forgive me) the voltage will drop anywhere from a little to a lot. So like MisterBill2 said - "A Great Deal Of Explanation Is Required". Without further explanation - there's nothing we can do to assist. At least nothing more that I can add.
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
17,240
yes, but i want to know is there any circuit (with transistor and op-amp) that i can achieve this goal . webench just helped to find dc-dc convertor.
The only way this would be possible is if you already have a +100V power supply. Amplifiers do not do power conversion; they use an existing supply to make a "copy" of low level signals. Only a DC-DC converter can do what you have asked.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
9,792
The answer is No.
You need a DC to DC Boost converter.
E
Certainly a boosting converter can be created with an op-amp oscillator driving a transistor amplifier stage, and it can even provide a DC output if rectification and filtering are provided. BUT it will not be as efficient as a well designed boost type power converter, which is one form of a switching mode power supply. An examination of the various switching supply configurations is what I suggest. It will not be very efficient, either, and it weill not provide good regulation of the output voltage. It is not a direct arrangement, but rather a series of stages. Not at all what is asked for. But it can be done.
That should be clear to an electrical engineer
 
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