I am a begginer would like to know what this is

Thread Starter

Johnrobert

Joined Sep 30, 2019
8
Its the live wire from where I plug my electric bike in to charge
to me it looks like some kind of fuse the wire is dead hence does not charge
This wire goes directly to the battery management system to charge batteries
I peeled the rubber insulation off
Need to know what it is so I can make a new cable

it might be hard to tell from the picture

thanks
 

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dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
15,117
Welcome to AAC!

Have no idea what you're trying to show us in the pictures. One doesn't seem to have any relevant information and I can't make out what you're trying to show us in the second.

Take another picture that shows more details and indicate what it is that you want us to look at.
 

Thread Starter

Johnrobert

Joined Sep 30, 2019
8
Good point Its second picture first picture is to show you basically what it is
look at the orange wire its green in the middle it was covered with black insulation its the only bare wire
sorry could not get a better picture
 

narkeleptk

Joined Mar 11, 2019
548
It looks like a connection filled with dielectric goo. If there is a component in there it may be something like a fuse. You will probably need to remove it to investigate further if that is the best picture you can get
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
15,117
Good point Its second picture first picture is to show you basically what it is
look at the orange wire its green in the middle it was covered with black insulation its the only bare wire
sorry could not get a better picture
I tried to brighten the relevant area:
upload_2019-9-30_19-49-40.png

Remove power and measure continuity through the green blob. If it shows opened, it might be a fuse.

I'd also try contacting the manufacturer for information.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
13,144
There is a whole lot of information missing here, and without more explanation the pictures are not useful. This forum can provide a whole lot of good accurate advice but without enough information all you can get is guesses that may not be at all related to what you are hoping to be asking.
It takes two conductors at least to provide a charging circuit, and while we see a close up of some wires there is not much of an explanation to go with them.
Also, do you have a way to measure either voltage or resistance, since you will need to be able to do measuring to locate the actual failure point, unless it is very obvious.
What I think that I see in the one picture is a part encased in glue that had been hidden in a section of heat-shrink tubing. But that is only a guess, based on some experience, it may not be correct.
 

MrSoftware

Joined Oct 29, 2013
2,029
I understand your bike is not charging and you're not sure where the problem is. You suspect it might be in the wiring. Get yourself a multi meter with a continuity feature (almost all of them have it, even the cheap ones). When in this mode, if you touch the two probes together it will beep, indicating a complete circuit. UNPLUG your bike charger, then use this feature to check each wire to make sure the wire isn't broken. For example, stick one probe into the socket in your picture, then touch then opposite end of the wire inside your bike charger with the other probe. If it beeps then the wire is good, if no beep then the wire is bad (or blown fuse, etc..). This way you can quickly either eliminate or implicate the wiring as the cause. Here's a video demoing the continuity feature, just do the same thing for the wires. Let us know what you find and we can take it from there.

Edit-> The second picture looks like a crimp connection or one of those heat to solder and shrink connections, it does not look like a fuse to me. That would be an unusual place for a fuse to be. An in-line fuse would most likely be in a fuse holder of some sort, or more likely the fuse would be on the circuit board itself. A continuity check will tell you instantly if the wire isn't conducting power, but I suspect the problem is elsewhere.
 
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Thread Starter

Johnrobert

Joined Sep 30, 2019
8
I tried to brighten the relevant area:
View attachment 187146

Remove power and measure continuity through the green blob. If it shows opened, it might be a fuse.

I'd also try contacting the manufacturer for information.
Thanks for the great effort.

I already did I got a one-line reply saying the battery is unserviceable, I bypassed the dead plug and it charges to 42V perfect I tested 30 cells all are good
it's a propriety battery they want $650 for a new battery
 

Thread Starter

Johnrobert

Joined Sep 30, 2019
8
I understand your bike is not charging and you're not sure where the problem is. You suspect it might be in the wiring. Get yourself a multi meter with a continuity feature (almost all of them have it, even the cheap ones). When in this mode, if you touch the two probes together it will beep, indicating a complete circuit. UNPLUG your bike charger, then use this feature to check each wire to make sure the wire isn't broken. For example, stick one probe into the socket in your picture, then touch then opposite end of the wire inside your bike charger with the other probe. If it beeps then the wire is good, if no beep then the wire is bad (or blown fuse, etc..). This way you can quickly either eliminate or implicate the wiring as the cause. Here's a video demoing the continuity feature, just do the same thing for the wires. Let us know what you find and we can take it from there.

Edit-> The second picture looks like a crimp connection or one of those heat to solder and shrink connections, it does not look like a fuse to me. That would be an unusual place for a fuse to be. An in-line fuse would most likely be in a fuse holder of some sort, or more likely the fuse would be on the circuit board itself. A continuity check will tell you instantly if the wire isn't conducting power, but I suspect the problem is elsewhere.
Thanks for taking the time to help me much appreciated, very good picture

I do have a Multimeter and the only wire that's dead is the one shown.
Good point about the fuse or not a fuse I was thinking the same I know very little about electronics, but I think it must be some kind of one-way protection since it connects the charger to the battery management system that charges the battery, stops it backing up or something
I don't think its absolutely necessary since there are many YouTubes how to build a battery pack don't remember seeing anything like this will check again. there is a fuse in the external charger.

A poster mentioned try contacting the manufacturer for information.

.I already did I got a one-line reply saying the battery is unserviceable, I bypassed the dead wire and it charges to 42V perfect I tested 30 cells all are good
it's a propriety battery they want $650 for a new battery
 
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MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
13,144
I understand your bike is not charging and you're not sure where the problem is. You suspect it might be in the wiring. Get yourself a multi meter with a continuity feature (almost all of them have it, even the cheap ones). When in this mode, if you touch the two probes together it will beep, indicating a complete circuit. UNPLUG your bike charger, then use this feature to check each wire to make sure the wire isn't broken. For example, stick one probe into the socket in your picture, then touch then opposite end of the wire inside your bike charger with the other probe. If it beeps then the wire is good, if no beep then the wire is bad (or blown fuse, etc..). This way you can quickly either eliminate or implicate the wiring as the cause. Here's a video demoing the continuity feature, just do the same thing for the wires. Let us know what you find and we can take it from there.

Edit-> The second picture looks like a crimp connection or one of those heat to solder and shrink connections, it does not look like a fuse to me. That would be an unusual place for a fuse to be. An in-line fuse would most likely be in a fuse holder of some sort, or more likely the fuse would be on the circuit board itself. A continuity check will tell you instantly if the wire isn't conducting power, but I suspect the problem is elsewhere.
I have come across fuses in places that are well hidden. It seems that some companies want to make their products non-repairable, or hard to fix at best.
 

Thread Starter

Johnrobert

Joined Sep 30, 2019
8
I have come across fuses in places that are well hidden. It seems that some companies want to make their products non-repairable, or hard to fix at best.
Yes its some kind of fuse or one-way shunt whatever that is, the fact is the wire is dead at that point so it's acting like a dead fuse
I wonder how many people have shelled out and bought new batteries when all it was the 2-inch line to charge the battery is interrupted by something that costs 10 c and having to spend $650 add to the landfill with a toxic substance, in fact, the whole bike would have been thro away, worth no where near the price of the battery
I connected a new wire without a fuse and all is working, there is a fuse in the charger
I see many bikes on Craig's List super cheap saying new battery needed the battery is by far the most expensive component on the bike
 

MrSoftware

Joined Oct 29, 2013
2,029
It would be worth taking that piece apart a little more to try to identify what's inside it. If it was there for safety (fuse, diode) you might want to replace it.
 

Thread Starter

Johnrobert

Joined Sep 30, 2019
8
Great idea I was about to assembly the batteries in its custom case, will chop it off not needed anymore but other side will be live have to insulate Since I have done all this might as well find out what it is
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
13,144
Great idea I was about to assembly the batteries in its custom case, will chop it off not needed anymore but other side will be live have to insulate Since I have done all this might as well find out what it is
I suggest that you have a fuse in line near the battery connection, to protect the wires and the battery in case of a short circuit. But use a fuse that is easy to check and replace. They do provide a lot of protection, and so they are a good idea. But not hidden fuses.
 

MrSoftware

Joined Oct 29, 2013
2,029
Especially with a lithium battery, they catch fire when they're not happy. A fuse could help in the case of a short or other charger problem, and given that the first one apparently blew it would not be a bad idea to replace it and look a little closer if it blows again.

Edit --> As mentioned above, it's a Littlefuse brand fuse, you just need to figure out what size. Can you make out any other markings on it?
 

Thread Starter

Johnrobert

Joined Sep 30, 2019
8
It says LF 250V its a 36 V battery I can just make it out in the middle picture
I just tested the fuse with a continuity tester and it is dead
I will install another fuse

Thanks
 
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MrSoftware

Joined Oct 29, 2013
2,029
It's a 250V fuse, but you need to know the current rating. Too small and it will blow right away, too big and it won't blow when it needs to.
 
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