How to wire parallel or series connection on a stripboard ?

Thread Starter

M3D0

Joined Oct 8, 2020
49
I know that this could be a stupid question, but I really searched a lot for the basic connections like the parallel and series connection on a stripboard to take it for a reference and I didn't find any. I know how to use the breadboard very well and I know that the stripboard will be very similar to it, but I just can't imagine it and I can't wrap my mind around this idea very well. I need a simple schematic diagram for a simple series circuit and another for the parallel connection. Thanks in advance!
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
10,515
Here're some examples with resistors. Red horizontal lines are stripboard. Blue is a connecting wire. You can also zig-zag (as in far left series) with the component leads.

1602730662655.png

Mounting axial components (like the resistors shown) vertically reduces the space used.

Example of vertical mount:

1602731029989.png
 

Alec_t

Joined Sep 17, 2013
11,744
Sometimes, depending on layout, you need to remove the copper (a 3mm drill bit does the trick) around a hole in a strip to leave a gap when making a series connection.
 

Thread Starter

M3D0

Joined Oct 8, 2020
49
Sometimes, depending on layout, you need to remove the copper (a 3mm drill bit does the trick) around a hole in a strip to leave a gap when making a series connection.
I did this simple wiring diagram, and I hope that I got it right this time. My intention here was to wire all of the ( solenoid, servo motor, and nodemcu) in a parallel connection. So on what you said on removing the copper, should I disconnect here the rest of the unused copper lines on each of the used nodes? I'm still not sure if I did it right, I hope you could verify what I did here.

Note:
1-I didn't wire the signal connection, as it would get wired to the nodemcu.
2- Do I have to connect the ground wire of the nodemcu to the ground of the battery, or should I just connect the VIN pin only to the battery?

parallel_schematic.png
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
10,515
Another way to cut the strips is with a small round burr/cutter in a hand tool like a Dremel:
1602757506127.png



As for drills, most common are 118° included angle. Sheet metal ("aircraft") drills are 135° included angle. That means you do not need to drill as deeply into the PCB to cut the track. Even wider angles are available, but probably are not worth the expense.
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
10,515
I did this simple wiring diagram, and I hope that I got it right this time. My intention here was to wire all of the ( solenoid, servo motor, and nodemcu) in a parallel connection. So on what you said on removing the copper, should I disconnect here the rest of the unused copper lines on each of the used nodes? I'm still not sure if I did it right, I hope you could verify what I did here.

Note:
1-I didn't wire the signal connection, as it would get wired to the nodemcu.
2- Do I have to connect the ground wire of the nodemcu to the ground of the battery, or should I just connect the VIN pin only to the battery?
Yes, you need a common ground if the power (VIN) is also common.
 

Thread Starter

M3D0

Joined Oct 8, 2020
49
Another way to cut the strips is with a small round burr/cutter in a hand tool like a Dremel:
View attachment 219666



As for drills, most common are 118° included angle. Sheet metal ("aircraft") drills are 135° included angle. That means you do not need to drill as deeply into the PCB to cut the track. Even wider angles are available, but probably are not worth the expense.
I didn't know that! Thanks again for the details. I have a question though, How deep should I use the cutter, or should I just scratch the copper strip till it's gone?
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
10,515
With a drill, you need to go only as deep as necessary to cut the track. The image I posted is not very clear, but you can see the tiny white slot on the right between the two soldered connections. The advantage of using a burr is that the holes are preserved for soldering components or connections.

If you use a board with copper on both sides, drilling at a hole only one side will allow a connection on only one side. That is useful if one side is, say, is a ground plane or other common connection.

On my layouts, I indicate those cuts with a tiny solid bar like this:
1602760063023.png
 

Thread Starter

M3D0

Joined Oct 8, 2020
49
With a drill, you need to go only as deep as necessary to cut the track. The image I posted is not very clear, but you can see the tiny white slot on the right between the two soldered connections. The advantage of using a burr is that the holes are preserved for soldering components or connections.

If you use a board with copper on both sides, drilling at a hole only one side will allow a connection on only one side. That is useful if one side is, say, is a ground plane or other common connection.

On my layouts, I indicate those cuts with a tiny solid bar like this:
View attachment 219670
Thank you !
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
5,239
Exacto blade is my method of choice. I'll take an old pair of wire cutters and nip the very tip of the exacto blade and use the sharp edge to cut the trace and the back edge to scrape out the excess copper.
 
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