How to properly crimp sockets?

Thread Starter

NVZN1

Joined Dec 17, 2016
18
Hello! I'm kinda new in Electronics, so i wanna ask :

  1. How to properly install cable to these socket?
  2. Is this Cable too big?
  3. Or maybe use this cable? (i'm gonna put this on DC DC reducer output 12V 10A max)
  4. Should the first teeth grip the rubber cable, or the copper, like the second teeth?
  5. Should i just crimp or add with solder?

If u guys wondering what i'm trying to do, i want to use my dc-dc reducer. And this DC reducer look like this.


The reducer itself has 3 wires :
- red to Battery 48V input positive.
- Yellow for 12V output positive.
-Black is for both Battery and 12V output negatives.
 

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jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
7,912
1) Those are crimp terminals. After proper crimping, they usually (i.e., the ones you show) insert from the back of the plastic part and are retained by the barb. There are other methods of retention.
2) The terminals come with a specification for the wire size for which they are designed. As a hobbyist, you can often exceed that specification (either a little bigger or smaller), but the result may not be perfect.
3) The first crimp (i.e., nearest the insulation) is usually a strain relief and holds the insulation, not the conductor.
4) Do not solder (usually). It introduces strain and can lead to earlier breakage of the wire.

Those comments refer to stranded wire. Solid core wire is different.
 

Thread Starter

NVZN1

Joined Dec 17, 2016
18
1) Those are crimp terminals. After proper crimping, they usually (i.e., the ones you show) insert from the back of the plastic part and are retained by the barb. There are other methods of retention.
2) The terminals come with a specification for the wire size for which they are designed. As a hobbyist, you can often exceed that specification (either a little bigger or smaller), but the result may not be perfect.
3) The first crimp (i.e., nearest the insulation) is usually a strain relief and holds the insulation, not the conductor.
4) Do not solder (usually). It introduces strain and can lead to earlier breakage of the wire.

Those comments refer to stranded wire. Solid core wire is different.
woah!
Okay, i have some question for number 2
i cant find those connector specifications, so i assume using green wire is better. the green wire fits well. Anyway the current is maybe 10Amps, because it's product are DC-DC Reducer 35V-70V 10A to 12V. I'm afraid the wire will get burned or something. I dont really connect to heavy 12V equipment, but, i need to know.

Anyway for number 1, what's the proper crimping (in case i didnt know).. thanks for reply :D
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
7,912
Here is one example of a crimper: https://www.ebay.com/itm/IWISS-Crimperfor-Delphi-Metri-Pack-Weather-Pack-Terminals-0-35-2-0mm-14-22AWG/182824397782?hash=item2a912eebd6:g:tAsAAOSwQQ9cRXg4
That is not a recommendation either good or bad.

Note it is for 14 to 22 gauge. That is a common range and is based on the conductor (wire) size. Your first wire looks to be in that range. Maybe it is 12 gauge. The second (green) wire looks smaller. With stranded wire, the crimp on the wire is curled inward. The part of the crimper that does that is called a "die." Sometimes the crimp on the insulation is the same or just barrel shaped. There are lots of different crimpers on the market and prices vary from a few dollars to hundreds ($). The latter are for commercial quality. There are also crimpers for different cable types. For example, with shielded cable, the outer ferrule (shield) uses a different die than is used for the conductor.

I make do mostly with a unbranded crimper for for the type of terminals you show. It has a ratched mechanism that lets releases when the crimp is complete. That gives more consistent crimps. I have another crimper for shielded cable (Iwiss, HT-336G). Inexpensive combination wire stripper and crimpers abound. One of mine is the Vaco 70362 (probably obsolete) Waldon makes something similar. Radio Shack used to sell something like this:
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Mine only has two crimp slots and was suitable for 20 to 28 gauge wire. I used it for crimp connections in model servos for many years until I got the ratcheting version.

There are just so many possibilities to consider,and everyone will have an opinion. You do not need one of everything. :)

A few guidelines:
1) A ratcheting version will give more consistent crimps (see post #5), but costs more than the Vaco/Waldon versions mentioned. You can "over crimp" a connector. Ratcheting tools help prevent that.
2) Big Box stores carry some decent brands. Klein is another one in addition to what's been mentioned.
3) You need a wire stripper and crimper. They are often separate tools or, like the Vaco/Waldon, may be combined into a single tool.
4) I typically use a separate stripping tool. Some like the Triplett Power Strip are very good for wires with soft insulation, like speaker wires and automotive wire. Its design minimizes nicks in the wire. The Klein 11063 "Katapult" has cutting dies for the insulation and works well, but you need to be more concerned about nicks. It is fast and like the Triplett only requires one hand. For fine wires (e.g., 24 to 30 gauge), I use a Jonard JIC 2030. That requires two hands.
5) Don't be misled by brand names, even though I have mentioned a few. They just happen to be what I own. Some are >40 years old. You can pay a lot more for something that has an equivalent unbranded version for less. Many different brands are probably made in the same factory. Get what works and fits your needs.

At this point, I suggest you go shopping online. Find some items you like, and then ask opinions about those choices here.
 
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