How do I load electronic balance weighing values into my computer?

Thread Starter

Jung Yong

Joined Mar 8, 2017
5
Good morning everybody ^^

I operate a general manufacturing business, which is out of the field of electronics.
Our factory has an electronic balance of a type that hangs on a crane purchased about five years ago.

I would like to retrofit the weighing values of this electronic balance into my computer.

I thought a lot about it, but I thought it would be best if I could extract it from the LED display (FND).
This is because not only the balance but also the temperature of the calcining furnace, the press counter, etc......

I wonder if it is possible to extract such data from the 7-segment LED display of this electronic balance and what kind of technology is needed.

Many seniors, I would like to hear from your advisers.
Have a nice day^^
 

wayneh

Joined Sep 9, 2010
16,399
This would be much easier if the device has a port for data-out. Many scales do. I used a computer to log scale data for me 35 years ago. I think trying to hack a solution that reads the display will not be worth the time.

The general term for what you want is "data acquisition", which is using a computer to sample sensors and collect the data for analysis and display. This can be accomplished with both analog and digital sensors, and usually involves using an interface device such as LabJack or Dataq, or National Instruments equipment for more demanding needs.
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
21,823
If you can find the circuit schematic it would make your task a lot easier.
Otherwise, you have to hack the circuit - i.e. reverse engineer the circuit.

Start by disassembling the unit and take sharp, well focused photos of top and bottom of the circuit board. If the part numbers on the ICs are visible that will help. Otherwise you need to get an oscilloscope and examine the signals going to the seven-segment displays.

You need to find out if the 7-segment displays are non-multiplexed or multiplexed, common-anode or common-cathode.

Either way it is doable.
 

Thread Starter

Jung Yong

Joined Mar 8, 2017
5
Hi, wayneh^^

Thank you for your answer.
I searched LabJack, Dataq.
I do not know how to use it, but I think I can learn it.
Can you tell me which model is suitable for this purpose?

Thank you for your kind and quick reply.
 

Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
5,646
Either LabJack, Dataq, Measurement Computing or a host of others will likely work. They all pretty much come with software or you can write your own. Once you know exactly what you have for signals and any needed signal conditioning you can decide which data acquisition would suit your needs. Also, if you plan to collect and store data where and how to store it.

Ron
 

mcgyvr

Joined Oct 15, 2009
5,394
Hi, wayneh^^

Thank you for your answer.
I searched LabJack, Dataq.
I do not know how to use it, but I think I can learn it.
Can you tell me which model is suitable for this purpose?

Thank you for your kind and quick reply.
Why don't you give us the make and model of your existing unit.. Or just call them and ask..
That same company may have an alternate unit or display or whatever that would allow connection/logging by a computer..

The easiest/proper solution is to simply discuss your needs with the electronic balance manufacturer and let them get you what you need..

Attempting to "hack" what you have can cost you far more time/money
 

Thread Starter

Jung Yong

Joined Mar 8, 2017
5
This would be much easier if the device has a port for data-out. Many scales do. I used a computer to log scale data for me 35 years ago. I think trying to hack a solution that reads the display will not be worth the time.

The general term for what you want is "data acquisition", which is using a computer to sample sensors and collect the data for analysis and display. This can be accomplished with both analog and digital sensors, and usually involves using an interface device such as LabJack or Dataq, or National Instruments equipment for more demanding needs.
Either LabJack, Dataq, Measurement Computing or a host of others will likely work. They all pretty much come with software or you can write your own. Once you know exactly what you have for signals and any needed signal conditioning you can decide which data acquisition would suit your needs. Also, if you plan to collect and store data where and how to store it.

Ron

Hi!
Good morning, Ron,
Thanks so much,

I am very pleased and excited to hear your answer to LabJack, Dataq.
Unfortunately, now I do not know anything about those devices.

I would like to learn the simple usage of LabJack, Dataq.
It is hard to be motivated, but I try to learn the minimum usage for my single purpose only.
Korea has a saying, "ignorance is brave." ㅋㅋ
I look forward to teaching many seniors the way at this point.
As a kind of multi-tester, only the volts ...

It is only bullshit early in the morning.
 

Thread Starter

Jung Yong

Joined Mar 8, 2017
5
Why don't you give us the make and model of your existing unit.. Or just call them and ask..
That same company may have an alternate unit or display or whatever that would allow connection/logging by a computer..

The easiest/proper solution is to simply discuss your needs with the electronic balance manufacturer and let them get you what you need..

Attempting to "hack" what you have can cost you far more time/money


Thank You so much, mcgyvr!!

The manufacturer is now releasing products with the features I want with the new version.
They had encouraged me to buy new products.
But for some reason, I would like to retrofit an older version even if it is difficult.
It seems to be fun.

Thanks mcgyvr !!
 

Thread Starter

Jung Yong

Joined Mar 8, 2017
5
If you can find the circuit schematic it would make your task a lot easier.
Otherwise, you have to hack the circuit - i.e. reverse engineer the circuit.

Start by disassembling the unit and take sharp, well focused photos of top and bottom of the circuit board. If the part numbers on the ICs are visible that will help. Otherwise you need to get an oscilloscope and examine the signals going to the seven-segment displays.

You need to find out if the 7-segment displays are non-multiplexed or multiplexed, common-anode or common-cathode.

Either way it is doable.

Good Morning MrChips !!
Thank you so much for your answer.
I will disassemble the scales on the day that the factory will shut down according to your advice.
I do not have enough knowledge, but I think it is very interesting.

Thanks so much, MrChips!
Have a nice Day !!
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
21,823
For starters, tell us the make and model number of the unit.
You never know what you can find on an internet search.
 
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