Help! Video Doorbell with digital chime

Thread Starter

eagur

Joined Dec 27, 2020
6
Hi,

I'm trying to set up a Hikvision video doorbell to trigger a honeywell digital chime. I ran into an intermittent issue, where the power kit was not functioning properly- it was not sending enough voltage to the doorbell, and too much to the digital chime, frying the transformer. I'm guessing this happens because the digital chime does not have the same properties as a mechanical chime and the power kit malfunctions. (the digital trigger does wire up the same as a mechanical chime so you can replace one with the other)
I added a 12 ohm 25w wire wound resistor into the circuit so the digital trigger reacts the same as a mechanical chime (similar rest/trigger V and A)
This seems to have solved the issue in parallel.

My question is, should that resistor be in series or parallel? or does it matter?
Drawing attached- Hikvision setup is the same as Ring which had better drawings.

Thanks for the help!
 

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Thread Starter

eagur

Joined Dec 27, 2020
6
Hi, Thanks for the reply,
I have a newer DS-HD1
I'm not sure this example in the manual applies for my situation. The honeywell digital chime wires into the circuit in the same fashion as a mechanical chime, and is triggered when the power kit shorts that side of the circuit.
In the setup shown, without the powerkit, the doorbell does not provide that short on its own.
 

Wolframore

Joined Jan 21, 2019
2,273
The resistor is adding a load which must be missing with your digital chime. Wire it like they show.

Similar to what used to happen with LED bulbs on cars where the blinkers would go really fast.
 

Thread Starter

eagur

Joined Dec 27, 2020
6
Thanks, I'll give that a try.
The doorbell came with a fuse, which when measured doesn't show any resistance. I'll try using the 12 ohm resistor I have going now.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
8,735
Normally a voltage dropping resistor would be in series with the device needing the lower voltage. But you need to do some math first. If you know the voltage required by the lower voltage device and the current that it draws and the supply voltage that is available then it is possible to calculate the value of the series dropping resistor by ohms law: V/I=R, where V is the required voltage drop and I is the current drawn by the device that needs the lower voltage, and R is the value of the series resistor.
 

Thread Starter

eagur

Joined Dec 27, 2020
6
So I tried Wolframore's suggestion, and am more confused...
So basically its one circuit with everything in series, transformer to fuse to chime trigger to doorbell back to transformer.
I read 1.5V at the doorbell 17V at the transformer, so the chime trigger must be adding a lot of impedance/resistance. Not sure how the doorbell is functioning, as it requires 16-24V, and the chime trigger was getting warm (don't think that device is made to be in series like that). I'm using a honeywell RPWL4045A (wiring attached)

The initial setup had the power kit in parallel with the chime trigger (as per wiring a mechanical chime), and after ~10 hours, the doorbells had flickering LED's but were not functional (around 5v at the doorbell) and the chime trigger was quite warm (measured 11v there).

By putting a resistor in parallel with the trigger and power kit, I'm trying to give a lower resistance path so the current and voltage characteristics the power kit senses are more in line with a 9 ohm mechanical chime and not a 250 ohm trigger.
Is this what I am achieving? I think it is, because my meter reading are the same as if there was a mechanical chime present.
 

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Wolframore

Joined Jan 21, 2019
2,273
first I just noticed you’re using the instructions for the ring which may not have the same set up. Do you have the ring or the hikvison?

post a picture of the connections, it may have separate connections for power and chime according to their general diagram. The chime should be in series with the transformer, you may need the hikvisions power unit to be separately connected from transformer to unit.
 

Thread Starter

eagur

Joined Dec 27, 2020
6
Hey,

The connections and parts are all identical. I just grabbed the ring diagrams, they were easy to draw on.
 

Thread Starter

eagur

Joined Dec 27, 2020
6
The powerkit does the same thing on both hikvision and ring systems, allows power to the doorbell but doesn't ring the chime until you hit the button.

I think my powerkit has intermittent issues with the honeywell trigger because the impedance is different from the mechanical chime. I'm trying to trick the power kit into seeing similar impedance with the honeywell trigger in.
 
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