Help needed understanding if I am using the right power supply

Thread Starter

nic14

Joined Jan 8, 2014
12
Hello,

I just bought 2 small led video lights, the type you use to make youtube videos that can change the intensity of the light,
by mistake I haven't read the description and the lights came without power supply.

At the back of the light it says: Input Voltage 8~12V and Input Current 3A
I was wondering, can I use a PC power supply of 800W to power those lights?

Thanks for any explanation you may provide.

Regards
Nic
 

Yaakov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
1,536
Hello,

I just bought 2 small led video lights, the type you use to make youtube videos that can change the intensity of the light,
by mistake I haven't read the description and the lights came without power supply.

At the back of the light it says: Input Voltage 8~12V and Input Current 3A
I was wondering, can I use a PC power supply of 800W to power those lights?

Thanks for any explanation you may provide.

Regards
Nic
Yes, you can use any supply that provides enough current and is within that voltage range.

To calculate W, you multiply V*A. So, if provides 800W at 12V (you'll need to check that if it is a multiple voltage supply), they you can use W/V to work out A. However, that 800W is probably the total capacity of the supply, so check the label.
 

Thread Starter

nic14

Joined Jan 8, 2014
12
Thanks for the replies, so I would not be burning the lights up due to too much power?
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
8,877
Thanks for the replies, so I would not be burning the lights up due to too much power?
If you supply the correct voltage, the lights will only take what they need; and it should be less than 3A.
 

KMoffett

Joined Dec 19, 2007
2,770
The power supply will only provide only as much current as the lights need...as long as the supply output doesn't exceed 12VDC.
Ken
 

Yaakov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
1,536
Thanks for the replies, so I would not be burning the lights up due to too much power?
As @dl324 says, the light will only use as much current as it needs.

Since current is proportional to voltage, if you supply the right voltage you can never supply too much current.

You can think of it as the voltage enabling the current, which is only possible, it doesn't do anything by itself. You can have not enough current capacity, but not too much. Voltage needs to be correct. Too little won't work, too much will do damage.
 
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