Heads up on some pretty good 1% resistors for cheap.

Thread Starter

Ya’akov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
5,663
I just picked up this kit with has 60 values (300 pieces) of 1% ¼W resistors for $10.99. They range from 1Ω to 4.7MΩ nicely labeled in a little box.
1645051074732.png
But here's the thing, they test out to be from .1% to .25%. The four wire measurement on the 1Ω had values from .9943Ω to 1.007Ω for the five pieces. I really didn't expect them to be so in spec, being cheap and from a famously cheap source, but they are. So if you need some, there you go.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
14,467
Are the leads the nominal diameter for 1/4W (0.022" or 0.55mm) and non-magnetic?

EDIT: should have said non-ferrous.
 
Last edited:

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
14,467
The leads are not non-magnetic and they read .50mm on the calipers.
Guess I should have said non-ferrous.

I don't like the ones that are ferrous because they stick to some wire cutters (only have that problem with things like signal diodes now and maybe axial ceramic caps). If I have a choice, I stick with name brands like Yaego, RCD, Vishay, Roederstein, etc.. I bought most of them in reels of 5000 or ammo packs of 2000.

At least the leads aren't the infamous skinny variety that are so wimpy that they usually bend when trying to insert them in a breadboard.
 

Thread Starter

Ya’akov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
5,663
Guess I should have said non-ferrous.

I don't like the ones that are ferrous because they stick to some wire cutters (only have that problem with things like signal diodes now and maybe axial ceramic caps). If I have a choice, I stick with name brands like Yaego, RCD, Vishay, Roederstein, etc.. I bought most of them in reels of 5000 or ammo packs of 2000.

At least the leads aren't the infamous skinny variety that are so wimpy that they usually bend when trying to insert them in a breadboard.
I needed an assortment for prototyping and I figured it was worth a shot at the price. I am happy with what I got. On the tools, a demagnetizer might be a solution. I used to use a magnetic tape bulk eraser for such things but the housing broke.

One of these might just be enough.

1645054490735.png
But this thing is interesting and though it doesn't look very robust, it's the degaussing coil approach and made for tools.

1645054586211.png
 

ErnieM

Joined Apr 24, 2011
8,294
What are those wires used to hold them to the tape? Any why the funny colors? ;)

A few years back I bought myself a sample book similar to this one. My prototype work is most always done in SMD, and I got tired of having to wait for stuff to arrive.

These are great "samples" as the book holds the tiny parts in order, mine are nicely marked too.
 

Thread Starter

Ya’akov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
5,663
What are those wires used to hold them to the tape? Any why the funny colors? ;)

A few years back I bought myself a sample book similar to this one. My prototype work is most always done in SMD, and I got tired of having to wait for stuff to arrive.

These are great "samples" as the book holds the tiny parts in order, mine are nicely marked too.
I have a very similar book. It's a good prototyping resource.
 

MrSalts

Joined Apr 2, 2020
1,762
I hate these kits that are not standard E6 or E12 values. The worst are like this with some E6 values missing and E24 values sprinkled in. Why jump from 51 to 100? They are cheap because the selected values in the set are kind of a useless combination. Who needs 1% accuracy which such big gaps?

Here is a nice article on E-series, tolerances and standard values.
https://www.electronics-notes.com/a...tor-values-e-series-e3-e6-e12-e24-e48-e96.php
 
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