Fun master disconnect...

Discussion in 'Automotive Electronics' started by tedstruk, Oct 9, 2016.

  1. tedstruk

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 8, 2016
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    I wanted to put a master disconnect on my motor bike but they are to large to fit anywhere. I got a heavy-duty 12v 50a relay from G.rilys, to use as a cutoff. Wired In series with the ground it fires by a toggle switch hooked up to the mains. I tested it with a charger , but I am still a little worried about charging amps.
     
  2. tcmtech

    Distinguished Member

    Nov 4, 2013
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    2,444

    Why?
    Do you have a 50+ amp alternator and a group 24 or larger size battery on your bike? o_O
     
  3. tedstruk

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 8, 2016
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    Group,18 pumps out about 20 amps... I melted my test wires....
     
  4. tcmtech

    Distinguished Member

    Nov 4, 2013
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    Use the right size of wire for the job.

    Why do you need a disconnect on a motorcycle anyway?

    I don't follow the reasoning.

    As for heavy duty compact switches any common auto parts store carries heavy duty high current push pull type switches. Many rated for 50 - 75 amp continuous duty like this,.

    Amazon. $6.96 with 75 amp rating. https://www.amazon.com/Grote-82-2100-Push-Pull-Switch/dp/B001RLH2FW
     
  5. tedstruk

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 8, 2016
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    Sorry I sound ignorant.
    My old bike is a one of a kind, pass me down the road, top of the line stock chopper from the 80's, that was once the champ. I don't want to do anything that might change its course from #1! so maybe your push pull is the best idea! I just couldn't find one a G.rilys. thanks for the link.
    By the way, where would you hide this secret battery kill switch attached to the launch pad?
     
  6. tedstruk

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 8, 2016
    12
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    The alternator is of course AC through a rectifier-regulator, but the system isn't documented as amp meter capable, actually the entire machine is metered through a volt meter. I would like to change that and optimize the system... now that would be an original mod.
    I guess I have a lot of paper work ahead of me! The relay would probably be a good start, but there are already so many relays and safety switches on it already, I am really afraid of the charging amps and taxing the existing systems rectifier-regulator.
     
  7. tedstruk

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 8, 2016
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    What I don't want to do is ruin the current design... its working so good, its' priceless!

    Originally I figured that with the volt system, I could add a few extra bulbs and it wouldn't matter that much.
    I built a big tail light (I added 4 27w bulbs intermittent)- storage box trunk, out of a pair of caddy taillights, and the system worked but the system doesn't charge the battery at all, and the battery sulfated. So much for the 'if you got volts your ok' theory. The rectifier-regulator must be very ticklish in delivery and the DC that powers the lights, probably isn't controlled at the circuit, but just a stand and deliver system at a certain amps. I find it very disturbing that they might produce a consumer product that is unscathable, but the 80's were full of money for the system, and today's problems attest to it's mis-management. I really would like to ensure the original system is intact and secure, before I add a second wind generated charging and lighting system, but I would like to save my work. Do you think this champion motorcycle deserves a custom set of professional circuits(solar,wind, ect.) or do you think I should hack it?
     
  8. Lyonspride

    Member

    Jan 6, 2014
    49
    6
    Something you need to do is look at the FIA battery isolator and ask yourself "why all the extra terminals?"

    Disconnecting a battery when a vehicle is running can cause some serious damage, the FIA switch isolates the ignition circuit when it disconnects the battery and drops any residual charge in the ignition circuit to ground (usually via a resistor).
     
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