Equifax

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by joeyd999, Sep 12, 2017.

  1. joeyd999

    Thread Starter AAC Fanatic!

    Jun 6, 2011
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    Did I miss something over the past few days?
     
  2. crutschow

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    Mar 14, 2008
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    Yes, we've all (most of the country anyway) just been screwed by Equifax's lack of proper encryption of our critical personal data.
     
  3. Wendy

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    Mar 24, 2008
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    If yo go to their sit to find ouf the compromised your data they they to get you toaccept binding arbitration. Real winners they are
     
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  4. crutschow

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    I know more government regulations are anathema to our conservative friends, but it does seem like there needs to be a more serious penalty for companies not protecting our personal data.
    Right now they have no particular reason to be concerned about that (other than some bad press that lasts for a few weeks).
     
  5. crutschow

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    Also, some of their CEO's sold off big blocks of their personal stock after they found out about the leak but before the news was released to the public.
    Sounds like insider trading to me.
     
  6. joeyd999

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    You seem to believe that pro-small government == anti-justice. Your assumption is incorrect. But we cannot debate that here.
     
  7. crutschow

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    I see no particular relation between the two.
    But pro-small government advocate do seem to talk a lot about getting rid of "onerous" government regulations, which are the only things standing between me and corporate/Wall Street excess and monopoly.
     
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  8. joeyd999

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    I know.
     
  9. crutschow

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    Then why did you say I did?
     
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  10. killivolt

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  11. joeyd999

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    I was agreeing that you don't see a relation. One exists, but likely not in the way you would assume. Whether conscious of it or not.
     
  12. wayneh

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    Sep 9, 2010
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    FWIW, they've had to backtrack on two issues:
    1) Signing up for their identity protection does not forfeit your rights in future class actions and
    2) You will not be automatically enrolled and charged for the service when the free year expires.

    Maybe I'm a chump but I went ahead and signed up for the free monitoring. The confirmation process failed, though, because their servers are overloaded.
     
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  13. joeyd999

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    You can freeze/ unfreeze your credit reporting at the following links:

    https://www.freeze.equifax.com/Freeze/jsp/SFF_PersonalIDInfo.jsp
    https://www.experian.com/freeze/center.html#content-01
    https://freeze.transunion.com/sf/securityFreeze/landingPage.jsp

    This will prevent the opening of new accounts in your name.
     
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  14. wayneh

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    Conservative thought is not anti-regulation. Quite the opposite, actually. The law is incredibly important to protecting freedom and ensuring a free and functioning economy. It's the rules aimed at other goals such social engineering or other projects, often created and enforced without constitutional authority (I'm looking at you, EPA) that are abhorrent.

    Equifax should cease to exist as a company, in my opinion. They committed a crime against half of all Americans that, if you or I did to a single person, might land us in prison. 143 million counts of that crime should add up to some pretty serious time in prison.

    But, failing to protect against a hack is not quite the same as performing the hack itself. Leaving the bank vault door unlocked will never get the level punishment that removing stuff from the vault will get. And even the hack is not the same as seeking to profit off the stolen information.
     
  15. dl324

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    Mar 30, 2015
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    That's a double edged sword. It costs money to freeze and freezing also prevents you from opening new lines of credit.

    A better solution is for entities that expose your data to be held accountable for credit monitoring and repair for the lifetime of the affected individual; and to pay punitive penalties to the individual and the government (to pay for more oversight). To avoid liability, they need to show their breach couldn't have cause the problem.
     
  16. joeyd999

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    I agree re penalties for their negligence, including their full responsibility for making harmed individuals whole.

    The government can't even oversight itself. Make the consequences of lax security painful -- then they'll govern themselves.

    Onerous regulations upon honest corporations and individuals (who wind up paying for the cost of the regulations) is not justice. It is anti-justice.
     
  17. MrAl

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    Jun 17, 2014
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    Hi,

    Didnt they rescind that now? I hope so.
    What total jerks. The people responsible should be found and their credit should be diminished to zero. See how they like it.
     
  18. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    Better micro power FM TX s are available commercially. PM meif yo want help and point me the thread I can respond to.
     
  19. dl324

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    Mar 30, 2015
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    As of 9/8, there is no waiver of rights:
    upload_2017-9-13_14-0-3.png

    But they are still total jerks. They should handle our personal information more carefully and need to be held accountable.

    A couple dozen Democratic lawmakers are seeking testimony from Equifax, a couple dozen class action lawsuits have been filed, and a GOP bill that would have limited liability for companies like Equifax in instances like this should be dead.
     
  20. crutschow

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    Mar 14, 2008
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    I think "honest corporations" is close to an oxymoron, but that's another story. :rolleyes:
    So how do you have regulations to keep the "dishonest" corporations in line without putting it on the rest?
     
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