Electronic Design Standards - Minimum Basic

Thread Starter

enggricha

Joined May 17, 2014
86
Hi All

I have been designing electronic circuits and PCBs for a while now and have a fair bit of experience with these. However I do not follow any industry standards in my work. Recently someone asked me if I followed any electronic design standards in my designs!!

A web search dint help much. So I wanted to check if some one here can help with some start off information regarding these. If possible a pointer to the absolute basic and minimum standards that should be followed as standard best practice?
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
13,720
Hi All

I have been designing electronic circuits and PCBs for a while now and have a fair bit of experience with these. However I do not follow any industry standards in my work. Recently someone asked me if I followed any electronic design standards in my designs!!

A web search dint help much. So I wanted to check if some one here can help with some start off information regarding these. If possible a pointer to the absolute basic and minimum standards that should be followed as standard best practice?
One problem is that things keep changing. As the components get smaller and the speed of the signals goes up things must change. You might want to give your question some context.
 

Robin Mitchell

Joined Oct 25, 2009
819
There is no such thing as industrial standards when designing a circuit. However, when someone says something like that they may actually mean:
  • Do you follow EMC rules?
  • Does your design conform to all datasheets?
  • Is your routing technique proper (i.e. no stupid long traces, or 1 million vias)
  • Are your designs mass producible? (i.e. fiducal for pic and place)
 

crutschow

Joined Mar 14, 2008
24,953
Another important parameter:
Derating of critical electrical parameters is needed for good circuit reliability.
Typically you want to derate maximum power, voltage, and current to no more than about 50-75% of the maximum part rating.
This includes heat-sinking of solid-state power devices (voltage regulators, power transistors, etc.) to keep their junction temperature well below their maximum.
And be sure to take into account the maximum ambient temperature of the circuit location (which may be above room ambient) when doing the power derating.
 

Thread Starter

enggricha

Joined May 17, 2014
86
One problem is that things keep changing. As the components get smaller and the speed of the signals goes up things must change. You might want to give your question some context.
That in fact was my line of thought too... what I meant was standards like the ipc-2222a for example. Do designers follow standards like these and is following these standards a requirement at any level of professional design.
 

Thread Starter

enggricha

Joined May 17, 2014
86
Another important parameter:
Derating of critical electrical parameters is needed for good circuit reliability.
Typically you want to derate maximum power, voltage, and current to no more than about 50-75% of the maximum part rating.
This includes heat-sinking of solid-state power devices (voltage regulators, power transistors, etc.) to keep their junction temperature well below their maximum.
And be sure to take into account the maximum ambient temperature of the circuit location (which may be above room ambient) when doing the power derating.
I have learnt this the hard way. Couldn't agree more and very useful advice for others reading this thread.
 

Thread Starter

enggricha

Joined May 17, 2014
86
There is no such thing as industrial standards when designing a circuit. However, when someone says something like that they may actually mean:
  • Do you follow EMC rules?
  • Does your design conform to all datasheets?
  • Is your routing technique proper (i.e. no stupid long traces, or 1 million vias)
  • Are your designs mass producible? (i.e. fiducal for pic and place)
I meant standards like IPC standards.
 
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