Electric current and energy transfer

Thread Starter

Alchemy One

Joined Oct 5, 2019
205
I don't understand how this works. I have a 12 gauge wire hooked up to a battery and a switch. The wire being 1 feet long and its end is hooked up to 12V light bulb. I flipped the switch and the light bulb pretty much turns on instantly.

Now I imagine the wire stretching around the earth and its ends at the light bulb is 1 foot away from the battery. I flip the switch on, would the light bulb come on? If yes, how long would it take?
If you say no, imagine the wire is a foot in diameter or whatever it takes, would the light bulb turn on and if yes how long would it take? And if the light bulb was on the other side, the opposite end of the globe, the furthest distance from the source, would the light bulb turn on at different time frame in all of the above scienario or?

The main plot here being, the length of the wire and the distance of the load in relation to the source.
 

Thread Starter

Alchemy One

Joined Oct 5, 2019
205
You need 2 conductors, unless you use Earth return! o_O
=========================
You don't need two conductor.
If you want two conductors and you must, just take one conductor and cut it in half. OKay? Trust me it will work. You gonna stick to the subject and answer the post or you gonna do the usual?
My guess?, you will do the usual. This is how it looks like when someone does not have an answer to anything and yet take up time and energy. I need to take deep breath. I won't follow up to your next reply unless you....... nah you can't.
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
9,437
I don't understand how this works. I have a 12 gauge wire hooked up to a battery and a switch. The wire being 1 feet long and its end is hooked up to 12V light bulb. I flipped the switch and the light bulb pretty much turns on instantly.

Now I imagine the wire stretching around the earth and its ends at the light bulb is 1 foot away from the battery. I flip the switch on, would the light bulb come on? If yes, how long would it take?
If you say no, imagine the wire is a foot in diameter or whatever it takes, would the light bulb turn on and if yes how long would it take? And if the light bulb was on the other side, the opposite end of the globe, the furthest distance from the source, would the light bulb turn on at different time frame in all of the above scienario or?

The main plot here being, the length of the wire and the distance of the load in relation to the source.
This has already been hashed out.
https://forum.allaboutcircuits.com/...ception-about-electricity.183285/post-1684952
 

BobTPH

Joined Jun 5, 2013
4,742
=========================
You don't need two conductor.
If you want two conductors and you must, just take one conductor and cut it in half. OKay? Trust me it will work. You gonna stick to the subject and answer the post or you gonna do the usual?
My guess?, you will do the usual. This is how it looks like when someone does not have an answer to anything and yet take up time and energy. I need to take deep breath. I won't follow up to your next reply unless you....... nah you can't.
No, this is what it looks like when someone is trolling. Happy Newton’s birthday to you.

Bob
 

Danko

Joined Nov 22, 2017
1,263
Now I imagine the wire stretching around the earth and its ends at the light bulb is 1 foot away from the battery. I flip the switch on, would the light bulb come on? If yes, how long would it take?
Wire diameter 1m wrapped around Earth has inductance about 132H.
So, see diagram:
1640470662511.png
 

sparky 1

Joined Nov 3, 2018
702
The DC static electric and magnetic fields surrounding the wire interact with the many natural electrical and magnetic fields. The higher potential is attracted to the ground. Pure copper, perfect dielectric, shielding from the earth's magnetic field, wind, temperature and moisture make the idea impractical.
 

LowQCab

Joined Nov 6, 2012
1,914
"Theoretically", it would be a little slower than the Speed-of-Light.
So go do some Math, the Internet is loaded with specialized Calculators.
Absolutely worthless question, zero practical applications.
.
.
.
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
9,437
The DC static electric and magnetic fields surrounding the wire interact with the many natural electrical and magnetic fields. The higher potential is attracted to the ground. Pure copper, perfect dielectric, shielding from the earth's magnetic field, wind, temperature and moisture make the idea impractical.
A DC circuit with energy flow is not an electrostatic condition but it doesn't matter as static fields can carry energy. There is nothing magical about DC that changes the meaning of the Poynting vector. The energy doesn’t go far away from the wire, but it can travel quite long distances along the wire.
http://sharif.edu/~aborji/25733/files/Energy transfer in electrical circuits.pdf
How can we account for the process of energy transforma-
tion from the electric potential energy of electrons in the
battery to the heating of the resistor by the current in the
circuit? An answer is not found in common textbooks even
for the simplest circuit including a battery, connecting wires
and a load.
https://www.semanticscholar.org/pap...5552b72f7d6595c9809dc48689659c3fb5bfef2a?p2df

If electrons (with mass) carried the electrical power in a circuit we would need to make Newton's law corrections for wire bends. We don't because it doesn't happen with free electrons in good conductors.
 
Top