Dual timer relay with PIR?

Thread Starter

Andreas1

Joined Aug 24, 2022
3
Hi guys!
Im a bit of a newbie to this world and comes from the Halloween-haunters world.
I’m looking to some fairly simple and cheap automations with pneumatics, lights and sounds but i haven’t really found how I go about doing it, and if it really works.
How do I connect a pir sensor to multiple outlets? Is it possible?
For example a mini DFplayer and a relay at the same time. Could I connect a multiple relay board to the PIR and then connect multiple timer-relays from there? Haven’t figured out if and how the wires go then.

Anyone knows anything that could help me? Thanks!
 

Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
6,979
Well you start with a PIR sensor, that is easy enough. Based on what you mention I am guessing you want something which operates at mains voltage for example in the US it runs on 120 VAC in and outputs 120 VAC when active. Then output the PIR sensor into a multi outlet terminal strip you can plug other devices into like delay on make timers that fit your needs. I suggest doing things this way keeping things simple and modular, sort of a plug and play. A simple Google of "pir outdoor sensor Amazon" will bring up plenty of hits. Likewise Delay on make timers using Google. Also called "On Delay Timer".
 

Thread Starter

Andreas1

Joined Aug 24, 2022
3
Well you start with a PIR sensor, that is easy enough. Based on what you mention I am guessing you want something which operates at mains voltage for example in the US it runs on 120 VAC in and outputs 120 VAC when active. Then output the PIR sensor into a multi outlet terminal strip you can plug other devices into like delay on make timers that fit your needs. I suggest doing things this way keeping things simple and modular, sort of a plug and play. A simple Google of "pir outdoor sensor Amazon" will bring up plenty of hits. Likewise Delay on make timers using Google. Also called "On Delay Timer".
Thanks!
But yes and no, a would sometimes need a 220V outlet, for a normal lightbulb (in Europe), but also a small mp3-player and sometimes pneumatic solenoids, which usually operates on about 12V.
I also need the different timers to operate on seconds where they turn sometimes turn on and of multiple time’s within some seconds.
I guess relays and delay relays somehow are the way to go then..
 

Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
6,979
Thanks!
But yes and no, a would sometimes need a 220V outlet, for a normal lightbulb (in Europe), but also a small mp3-player and sometimes pneumatic solenoids, which usually operates on about 12V.
I also need the different timers to operate on seconds where they turn sometimes turn on and of multiple time’s within some seconds.
I guess relays and delay relays somehow are the way to go then..
Well alrighty then. I assume your mains power is 220 VAC. Then the 220 VAC can be reduced to 12 VDC and work from there using a PIR sensor made for use at 12 VDC. Next the sound effects. Ghose and goblins and whatever works for you. There are chips out there that allow recording of sound bites. Originally designed by ISD now offered by Novoton. They are available on small prefabricated modules. A Google of Chipcorder should get you some results. So you have a PIR sensor followed by delay on make timers and each timer drives a chipcorder to playback whatever audio you place on them. You may have to add amplification to the audio.

I started by simple and just keep in mind the more features we add you more we come down to you doing more assembly. Not knowing you expertise in circuit assembly the more difficult assembly becomes.

Next, another option is just let a uC (micro-controller) like an Arduino handle the PIR signal and allow it to do all the timing functions having the digital outputs trigger your chipcorder modules and anything else you have out there. It's just a matter of exactly what you want and your budget caps along with your skill level for assembly. Using a uC will require writing some code and uploading your code to your uC. You can have anything you want but the more there is adds to the complexity. Using a uC does make for simple but takes more effort and skill. Flashy things like 220 VAC lamps would be driven by SSR (Solid State Relay) also triggered by a uC in whatever order and delays you choose.

Ron
 

Thread Starter

Andreas1

Joined Aug 24, 2022
3
Thanks guys!
That’s the type of Pir I had in mind yes.
And most you describe isn’t really any news. I started out using arduino and there actually is a program designed for Halloweenhaunters to create shows on them without any code, but it was a bit too much of a hassle I thought. So I’d prefer to keep the switches a little more simple and only wire the pirs, relays, mp3 module and so on, if that’s possible that is.
What I wonder about the most is really if and how I would go about wiring a 5-12V pir to two or more relays or just one relay and one DFplayer for example?
If I wire the positive wires from two relays, the pir and power, and negative to negative, and all signals together only one relay seems to work properly and the other one just barely lights up, but doesn’t switch on/off..
 

Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
6,979
OK, then going with discreet components. I suggest you start with a clean sheet of paper and a pencil with a large eraser. Seriously list in sequence what you want to happen including your delays. PIR Sensor I would just look for a 12 VDC PIR sensor. Sensors like this can output a high or low level logic when they go active so you would likely want one that goes logic high (12V out) when it detects someone. Next you have your timers so one sensor can drive as many timers as you want. They will be delay on make or delay on. So your PIR sensor triggers your timers. Module timers like this normally can be had with a relay output so after a set time the relay on the timer module goes active. Those relays in turn make happen whatever you want to happen. The downside is you have a pile of timers to trigger. Most timers like this merely look for a state change on their trigger input they are not drawing any current to speak of.

What I wonder about the most is really if and how I would go about wiring a 5-12V pir to two or more relays or just one relay and one DFplayer for example?
If I wire the positive wires from two relays, the pir and power, and negative to negative, and all signals together only one relay seems to work properly and the other one just barely lights up, but doesn’t switch on/off..
This depends on exactly how much load your PIR sensor can drive? How much current your relay coils need? If the supplied PIR current isn't enough to drive a relay coil or two relay coils in parallel you want to add a transistor or MOSFET to drive your relays. In your scenario here it's a matter of how much current your sensor can output verse how much current your relay coils need to pull in. Most off the boat hobby type PIR sensors do not come with specification sheets. Additionally most off the boat hobby relays seldom meet their contact ratings so keep that in mind. This is where you use a MOSFET to drive your relays. The source current needs to exceed the load current by at least 20%.

Ron
 
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