Difference between a Hall effect potentiometer and a regular one?

Thread Starter

Cyrus Mingley

Joined Apr 18, 2020
87
I have a motor that requires a 5k ohm potentiometer, but it also has to be a Hall effect one. How can I manage this? Is there a difference, and I can’t seem to find any 5k ohm Hall effect potentiometers anywhere.
 

ericgibbs

Joined Jan 29, 2010
10,039
hi CM,
Do you have a motor type ident name you could post or a link to the motor supplier, we can then check the potentiometer type.
E
 

Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
5,454
No, all you need is a 5K linear potentiometer available just about anywhere. Something like this will do fine or you can get fancy and look for a 10 turn 5K linear pot. Whatever you choose just make sure you have a knob included. :)

I know what a hall effect switch is and I know what a potentiometer is but I haven't a clue what a hall effect potentiometer is? :)

Ron
 

Thread Starter

Cyrus Mingley

Joined Apr 18, 2020
87
No, all you need is a 5K linear potentiometer available just about anywhere. Something like this will do fine or you can get fancy and look for a 10 turn 5K linear pot. Whatever you choose just make sure you have a knob included. :)

I know what a hall effect switch is and I know what a potentiometer is but I haven't a clue what a hall effect potentiometer is? :)

Ron
Okay, right on. Neither do i, i did a quick search and didn't find anything. I found hall effect throttles like the guy said to use but nothing about a hall effect potentiometer, so not sure. Oh well, thanks for the help. Clarification is always nice
 

Thread Starter

Cyrus Mingley

Joined Apr 18, 2020
87
No, all you need is a 5K linear potentiometer available just about anywhere. Something like this will do fine or you can get fancy and look for a 10 turn 5K linear pot. Whatever you choose just make sure you have a knob included. :)

I know what a hall effect switch is and I know what a potentiometer is but I haven't a clue what a hall effect potentiometer is? :)

Ron
https://support.electricscooterparts.com/support/discussions/topics/1000088568

here was where i saw it, he said "hall effect throttle" and i assumed he meant a potentiometer.
 

RobNevada

Joined Jul 29, 2019
54
One thought is to use more than one halls sensor with a sliding magnet and as the magnet approaches and activates that halls sensor this output is feed to a microprocessor input that signals an output to a resistor that generates the resistance value needed.
 

Thread Starter

Cyrus Mingley

Joined Apr 18, 2020
87
One thought is to use more than one halls sensor with a sliding magnet and as the magnet approaches and activates that halls sensor this output is feed to a microprocessor input that signals an output to a resistor that generates the resistance value needed.
Cool idea, but i'm trying to keep this project cheap.
 

Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
5,454
You want a pot like I linked to. In your drawing you see Wiper, Low and High. The low and high are the end terminals of the pot and wiper the center terminal. Now if the pot rotation doesn't suit you just reverse the low and high wires on the pot terminals. Like if you want clockwise rotation to increase speed and it's backwards just reverse low and high. OK, just saw your post.

"We have never run the wires outside of the motor so unfortunately, we can not offer any advice regarding how to do that or which wires to connect to a modern BLDC controller. The wires may have universal colors though which would make connecting easy. Also not sure what 48V BLDC controller to recommend for it. A 500 Watt controller would be easiest on the motor, however, may not provide much more power than the original 400 Watt built-in controller. Just about any throttle can be used with a BLDC controller as long as it is a hall effect throttle".

OK, I see what they are getting at. Making it simple a hall effect sensor or multiple hall effect sensors can be used to measure motor rotational speed (RPM). Some speed controllers use those signals to monitor speed. Your motor has an internal speed control and only an external pot, based on the drawing, is required. No clue what they refer to a ha;ll effect throttle that way.

Ron
 

Thread Starter

Cyrus Mingley

Joined Apr 18, 2020
87
You want a pot like I linked to. In your drawing you see Wiper, Low and High. The low and high are the end terminals of the pot and wiper the center terminal. Now if the pot rotation doesn't suit you just reverse the low and high wires on the pot terminals. Like if you want clockwise rotation to increase speed and it's backwards just reverse low and high. OK, just saw your post.

"We have never run the wires outside of the motor so unfortunately, we can not offer any advice regarding how to do that or which wires to connect to a modern BLDC controller. The wires may have universal colors though which would make connecting easy. Also not sure what 48V BLDC controller to recommend for it. A 500 Watt controller would be easiest on the motor, however, may not provide much more power than the original 400 Watt built-in controller. Just about any throttle can be used with a BLDC controller as long as it is a hall effect throttle".

OK, I see what they are getting at. Making it simple a hall effect sensor or multiple hall effect sensors can be used to measure motor rotational speed (RPM). Some speed controllers use those signals to monitor speed. Your motor has an internal speed control and only an external pot, based on the drawing, is required. No clue what they refer to a ha;ll effect throttle that way.

Ron
Great, thanks for your help. If i wire it the way the diagram does, which direction will increase the throttle?
 

Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
5,454
Yes if you have a Volt meter. Normally the Low is Ground and the High is some positive voltage. The Wiper of the pot will increase as the pot is rotated away from ground towards V+. That is normally increasing voltage = increasing speed. So you measure the pot wiper to ground (wiper not connected to motor). You want CW rotation to give you increasing voltage with respect (reference) to ground.

Ron
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
20,697
Looks to me like a regular linear 5k pot, controllers typically use this for 0-10v input, the hall commutation is done by the controller, not the pot.
Max.
 
Last edited:

bwilliams60

Joined Nov 18, 2012
1,314
Toromont Caterpillar used an 8V Hall Eefect potentiometer as their throttle position sensor for a number of years on their engines used in Heavy trucks and heavy equipment. The manufacturer escapes me right now but if you are interested, let me know and I will find the information for you. They are hard to find if you've never seen them before. Caught me off guard the first time I diagnosed one
 

Thread Starter

Cyrus Mingley

Joined Apr 18, 2020
87
Toromont Caterpillar used an 8V Hall Eefect potentiometer as their throttle position sensor for a number of years on their engines used in Heavy trucks and heavy equipment. The manufacturer escapes me right now but if you are interested, let me know and I will find the information for you. They are hard to find if you've never seen them before. Caught me off guard the first time I diagnosed one
Oh wow, cool. I don't think I need the info, but I'll let you know if I do. Thanks for the answer!
 
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