Device like soldering iron but temperature up to 100 celsius

Thread Starter

peterlars

Joined Feb 20, 2017
7
Hi guys,

I was wandering if anyone knows a device like soldering iron but with temperature reaching up to 100C. Need it for some experiments.
Thank you in advance.

Peter
 

crutschow

Joined Mar 14, 2008
34,455
Use a lamp dimmer to power a standard soldering iron and control the voltage to get the temperature you want.
Ot do you need to have a control that reads out the temperature?
 

GopherT

Joined Nov 23, 2012
8,009

Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
7,520
If a soldering iron powered using a lamp dimmer won't work you could look at "Cartridge Heater" options including a correct length and diameter cartridge heater driven by a lamp dimmer. A Google of cartridge heater should bring up a few dozen hits. Also, the tea cup and coffee cup heaters mentioned work well and I think some run on 12 volts for automotive applications.

Ron
 

Thread Starter

peterlars

Joined Feb 20, 2017
7
Use a lamp dimmer to power a standard soldering iron and control the voltage to get the temperature you want.
Ot do you need to have a control that reads out the temperature?
I need something that reads and regulates the temperature

Buy a tea cup heater. They are designed to be submerged. They get hotter than 100C when not submerged but water keeps them from going hotter while in the cup.

https://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/st...a_LSWsh2134umpy7Q0u399XZuc7iS8CSZ2RoCBXfw_wcB

Good idea but I need something to regulate and show the temperature. The temperature must be adjustable from 40 to 100C
 
Last edited by a moderator:

wayneh

Joined Sep 9, 2010
17,498
100°C is far below the typical soldering temperature and I'm not aware of any commercial device that will do what you ask.

You could build one by putting a soldering iron under feedback control of a LM35 thermometer attached to the barrel of the soldering tip. I'm not sure but you might be able to get enough power to the tip at 12V DC, to hold that temperature. This would give you an all-DC solution which could be easier to design and build. It'd be easy to test with a car battery to see if a soldering iron gets to boiling, or maybe someone here already knows.

Simple on/off control like a thermostat should be good enough to get your tip to within ±1°C or so. You could also look into using a PWM controller if you need to further slow down the rate of heating. You can buy those very inexpensively on eBay these days.
 

Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
7,520
I need something that reads and regulates the temperature




Good idea but I need something to regulate and show the temperature. The temperature must be adjustable from 40 to 100C
Before we get much further it would help to know what you are heating? For example an oven like box or maybe a metal plate?
Need it for some experiments.
Really needs to be further defined because what you are getting at now becomes a heater and control loop or system. You need a sensor to sense the temperature, a display to display the temperature and some form of temperature control. Depending on need the control may be as simple as an On/Off or more elaborate such as a form of PID (Proportional Integral Derivative) type control. You really need to define in some detail what experiments you have in mind? Include the expected tolerance for temperature you wish to maintain, for example 212 degrees F +/- 5.0 degrees F.

In some cases it becomes easier to build a turn key solution like buy a controller verse build and use a readily available sensor.

Ron
 

kubeek

Joined Sep 20, 2005
5,795
Hi guys,

I was wandering if anyone knows a device like soldering iron but with temperature reaching up to 100C. Need it for some experiments.
Thank you in advance.

Peter
My soldering iron goes to less than 100°C, but it is a circuit I copied ages ago from a magazine and can´t really find again, also I know for a fact the triac controller is not available anymore.

Anyway, if the form factor of a soldering iron and the range of available tips is ok for you, how about buying a replacement iron handle, and making/adapting your own electronics to get your temperature range?

What do you want to use it for? Do you need the sharp tips, or just to heat Something to 40-100°C?
 

Thread Starter

peterlars

Joined Feb 20, 2017
7
Before we get much further it would help to know what you are heating? For example an oven like box or maybe a metal plate?

Really needs to be further defined because what you are getting at now becomes a heater and control loop or system. You need a sensor to sense the temperature, a display to display the temperature and some form of temperature control. Depending on need the control may be as simple as an On/Off or more elaborate such as a form of PID (Proportional Integral Derivative) type control. You really need to define in some detail what experiments you have in mind? Include the expected tolerance for temperature you wish to maintain, for example 212 degrees F +/- 5.0 degrees F.

In some cases it becomes easier to build a turn key solution like buy a controller verse build and use a readily available sensor.

Ron
I need it for some experiments in human skin for acne vulgaris. Bertus posted the device that I was searching for.
 

wayneh

Joined Sep 9, 2010
17,498
...I'm not aware of any commercial device that will do what you ask.
Now I am aware. Thanks @bertus. This reconfirms my belief in searching far and wide for a commercial product before setting off to build anything. Nature and the marketplace are more abundant than we imagine.
 

wayneh

Joined Sep 9, 2010
17,498
This exactly what I was searching for. Thank you!!! I need it for some experiments in human skin for acne vulgaris.
My gym has a steam room and I've noticed it is exceptional for opening and cleansing pores. The eucalyptus spray is probably antimicrobial as well. Some of the pore cleansing is due to profuse sweating and I think the high moisture helps also beyond just making you feel hotter. A localized dry heat won't have these effects of full-body sweating and high moisture, but will bring blood flow to the treated area. I guess I'm predicting dry heat won't be as effective as wet. Do come back with your data.
 

Thread Starter

peterlars

Joined Feb 20, 2017
7
My gym has a steam room and I've noticed it is exceptional for opening and cleansing pores. The eucalyptus spray is probably antimicrobial as well. Some of the pore cleansing is due to profuse sweating and I think the high moisture helps also beyond just making you feel hotter. A localized dry heat won't have these effects of full-body sweating and high moisture, but will bring blood flow to the treated area. I guess I'm predicting dry heat won't be as effective as wet. Do come back with your data.
will do
 
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