Converting an AC winch to wireless

Thread Starter

Jwhitt

Joined Apr 8, 2018
7
Would someone help me to understand how I can convert a 120v AC winch from harbor freight to a remote control winch using mostly off the shelf circuitry.

The AC winch uses a bridge rectifier to convert to DC and that goes through a wired control before making it to the motor.

I’d like to use a 120 v rated receiver that is available off of Amazon to replace the wired control. The 120 powered receiver has a reverse, common, and forward connection but since it is being fed by AC the voltage comes out AC so the necessary polarity is not present to make motor work in reverse and forward direction
I’ve thought about two different solutions.
1. use a bridge rectifier convert to dc before entering the receiver, but I’m afraid that the 120v DC will damage the 120v AC receive
2. Use a normally open relay switch on the common leg of each common wire going to the motor. Can I set it up to have the each side close it’s own relay to complete the circuit to a bridge rectifier before going to the motor. What should I watch out for using this method?
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
10,555
Neither suggestion makes much sense as I read them. We can only guess at how the winch is controlled since we see no circuit drawing. If the winch is driven by rectified power right from the mains you will need isolation to allow it to safely work with the receiver, since that is also connected to the mains.
The good news is that a lot of reversing drive circuits have been presented on this site, and so locating one should not be a challenge. What you will need to get is two single-pole, double throw, relays rated for the current drawn by the winch, and with coils rated for the AC voltage from the receiver. A bit more expensive but it would work very well.
 

Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
6,324
My best guess is something like this one. Problem is less a schematic or getting into the thing it's about impossible to give you a solution. Normally a winch like this which has a DC motor reverses direction using as mentioned above two relays / contactors which have a mechanical interlock as well as an electrical interlock as well as limit switches. The box on the motor of what I linked to is not very large looking at the image. This is why best I can do is all pure guesswork. Can it be done remotely? Likely yes with the addition of a few components like a 2 channel wireless relay card. Less a schematic can't say for sure.

Ron
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
10,555
The simple scheme for a reversable control scheme that I mentioned before is intrinsicly interlocked so that no short circuit can happen if both directions are selected at the same time. In addition, that control scheme includes dynamic braking when ever the drive is switched off. That may, or not, be a benefit, since we have no hint at the application. Some applications work much better if coasting is permitted, some do not. The actual circuit has been posted many times on this venue.
 

Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
6,324
The simple scheme for a reversable control scheme that I mentioned before is intrinsicly interlocked so that no short circuit can happen if both directions are selected at the same time. In addition, that control scheme includes dynamic braking when ever the drive is switched off. That may, or not, be a benefit, since we have no hint at the application. Some applications work much better if coasting is permitted, some do not. The actual circuit has been posted many times on this venue.
Less a schematic as to exactly what there is for me it's all guesswork. :)

Ron
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
10,555
Less a schematic as to exactly what there is for me it's all guesswork. :)

Ron
The drive part of the circuit has two relays with "form C" contacts. The DC load, motor in this case, is connected between the two common connections. The two N.C. contacts are both connected to the power source negative side, The two normally open contacts are both tied to the power source positive side.
So with both relays off, the motor is short-circuited, providing dynamic braking, while when one or the other relays is operated, the motor runs one way or the other. Simple, easy to understand, and intrinsicly interlocked. So then the wireless remote control can operate one or the other relays. And any required limit switches would be in the relay coil circuit and so not handling much power. No guessing at all.
 

Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
6,324
The drive part of the circuit has two relays with "form C" contacts. The DC load, motor in this case, is connected between the two common connections. The two N.C. contacts are both connected to the power source negative side, The two normally open contacts are both tied to the power source positive side.
So with both relays off, the motor is short-circuited, providing dynamic braking, while when one or the other relays is operated, the motor runs one way or the other. Simple, easy to understand, and intrinsicly interlocked. So then the wireless remote control can operate one or the other relays. And any required limit switches would be in the relay coil circuit and so not handling much power. No guessing at all.
Yes, I get that I just don't know exactly what that winch uses, I am not seeing a schematic of exactly what the thread starter actually has. Show a circuit and we can suggest how we would make wireless control inclusive, less a schematic I see no way to modify what I can't see.

Ron
 
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