Converting about every electronic device as impedance RL

Thread Starter

AndrieGnd

Joined Jun 25, 2019
52
Hi !
The doctor in my school said that we can consider in terms of theoretical circuit elements that the "speaker" can be modeled as impedance RL with specific resistance, my confusion is how we can say that the "speaker" which outputs " - sounds - converted as impedance with specific resistance...
my problem is that the impedance isn't outputting sounds .. so how we consider it as "speaker"

Maybe I misunderstand something here and I don't know, much appreciated for help.

thanks alot.
 

ericgibbs

Joined Jan 29, 2010
8,750
hi A,
The statement: can be modelled as impedance RL with specific resistance, is the answer.
I think you would a agree an audio speaker has a coil, suspended in a magnetic field, so it has some impedance, also the coil has some resistance.

So any driving amplifier will 'see' an inductance in series with a resistance.

E
 

Thread Starter

AndrieGnd

Joined Jun 25, 2019
52
hi A,
The statement: can be modelled as impedance RL with specific resistance, is the answer.
I think you would a agree an audio speaker has a coil, suspended in a magnetic field, so it has some impedance, also the coil has some resistance.

So any driving amplifier will 'see' an inductance in series with a resistance.

E
You mean implicitly the sounds that I hear from the speaker in aspect of electronic's circuit sees it as "impedance"?!
 

ericgibbs

Joined Jan 29, 2010
8,750
hi,
To a driver circuit, the speaker is simply an Inductive Load that has some resistance.
Typically speakers are stated as having a 3R or 15R impedance,[ other impedances are sometimes used] rated at say 5Watts , 10Watts and so on ...

The amplifier designer will design the driver circuit to suit the speaker specification.

I guess you know how a audio speaker works.?

E
 

crutschow

Joined Mar 14, 2008
23,370
The speaker voice coil has an intrinsic inductance and DC resistance.
There is also an added AC resistive component due to the energy required to move the speaker cone and the air it is coupled to.
This added resistive component is the part that converts the electrical energy to sound energy.
This conversion is typically not very efficient, with only about 1% of the speaker input energy converted to sound energy.
 
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