controlling high power leds with arduino

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rickv073

Joined Oct 7, 2021
26
hi,

i'm still working on the aquarium led light from my last post. i want to control the led lights with an arduino, i want to control the intensity from 0 to 100% for every single color. is this possible? because all the leds are connected in series and have between 60 and 80v per channel, i will drive tem with different led drivers for every color. if it is possible what do i need?

i want to controll 100x 1watt led with 6 different colors, i will attach a picture of all the leds i will use.
 

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bassbindevil

Joined Jan 23, 2014
201
The switching drivers used in the little LED lamps for track lights (MR16, MR11) have an input which allows PWM dimming or (usually) analog dimming with a pot or control voltage. CL6807 for example, but that's only rated to 35 volts and one amp. But maybe the easiest is just to use a MOSFET driver and get your constant(ish) current with series resistors.
 
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ElectricSpidey

Joined Dec 2, 2017
1,962
I can find PWM drivers with constant current, but not with output voltages as high as 80 volts, so you may need to change your requirements.

That is to say, less LEDs in series.

What is the supply voltage you plan to use or have available?
 

dendad

Joined Feb 20, 2016
3,939
You could try something like this...
Arduino LED driver.jpg
One each for RED, GREEN and BLUE.
The base will be driven by 5V, so the Emitter will be around 4.3V. Therefore the current will be clamped at 4.3V/4.7ohms. A bit under 1A.
Put something together to test it, and maybe use a 110V incandescent lamp as a load to start, so if it does not work, no LEDs will be harmed.
Changing the 4R7 resister value will set the current, but use a 10W resistor as it will be hot, as will the transistor, so a heat sink will be needed.
This is not the most efficient way to solve your problem, or the most accurate one. But it is simple.
Also, set the current below the max LED current as that will extent their life, and this circuit will drift with temperature.
 

DickCappels

Joined Aug 21, 2008
7,959
The ATMEGA328, for example has six PWM channels. You probably only need R, G, and B and 8 bit should be more than enough resolution to hit a particular hue very closely. Just make sure you don't set the PWM pulse rate so high that your switch cannot keep up.

You might want to add some fast recover protection diodes if you have long wires between the Arduino and the tank cover. The diodes would catch "flyback" from the stray inductance in the wiring.
 

MrSalts

Joined Apr 2, 2020
712
Is this really worth tying up the thread with?
I'm wondering what the OP really wants to do because going beyond R, G and B LEDs is way complicated. I'd like to hear what he is trying to do and his definition of every color (or every color shown in his array). I thought other people here would support that question rather than someone undermining my comment to say...
I have LEDs of about the same hue displayed on my screen. I doubt they were sold as "pink".
 

BobTPH

Joined Jun 5, 2013
4,034
100 W of LED power will make a pretty bright aquarium. Why do you use 6 colors when 3 can be blended to make any color? Also, are you planning on a cooling fan? If these are as close together as you show, it’s going to get pretty warm.

Bob
 

Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
6,204
hi,

i'm still working on the aquarium led light from my last post. i want to control the led lights with an arduino, i want to control the intensity from 0 to 100% for every single color. is this possible? because all the leds are connected in series and have between 60 and 80v per channel, i will drive tem with different led drivers for every color. if it is possible what do i need?

i want to controll 100x 1watt led with 6 different colors, i will attach a picture of all the leds i will use.
In the interest of starting simple here is what I would suggest. Use a color picker to pick your colors you want. You can use the linked or any of a dozen similar color pickers online. I would start with an inexpensive 12 volt LED string of RGB LEDs. I would find an inexpensive 12 VDC power supply of 12 VDC and a few amps. Configure your LED string like this:

5050 LED String.png

The string I experimented with looked like this:
RGB Strip.png

The MOSFETs used were FQP30N06L logic level MOSFETs which are a 32 Amp 60 Volt MOSFET. The RGB LEDs are common anode making for easy low side switching.

You mentioned using an Arduino so starting with a basic simple setup you can work with your code for color effects like fade in and fade out and color change. Also as mentioned using 8 bit is more than enough. Just keep in mind you PWM out voltage is 5 Volts maximum. This is why a logic level MOSFET is used. How you do this and your choice of parts is up to you. There are dozens of code samples for LED color and fade effects online which are easily modified. This is merely a start out suggestion.

Ron
 

BobTPH

Joined Jun 5, 2013
4,034
Or you can use WS2812, 13, or 15, strips, which have individuality addressed RGB LEDs with 256 levels for each color. All can be controlled by a single GPIO pin on your Arduino. No additional circuitry needed.


Bob
 

Juhahoo

Joined Jun 3, 2019
250
Unfortunately, unless you think you can bring something really extraordinary into the design, there is no reason to pass ready made units and if needed, try to hack them to your liking, that would be my personal approach. Here are some candidates. Prices I consider reasonable for full unit with timer and remote and nicely packed into an enclosure. Power range from 300W up to 600W!

https://www.amazon.com/Relassy-Aqua...4e-f9f9-4a11-aaf4-e1c235605fcf&pd_rd_wg=VgX0U

https://www.amazon.com/Relassy-Aqua...4e-f9f9-4a11-aaf4-e1c235605fcf&pd_rd_wg=VgX0U

https://www.amazon.com/VIPARSPECTRA...08177&s=pet-supplies&sr=1-19&ts_id=2975458011
 

Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
6,204
Or you can use WS2812, 13, or 15, strips, which have individuality addressed RGB LEDs with 256 levels for each color. All can be controlled by a single GPIO pin on your Arduino. No additional circuitry needed.


Bob
That is another good option. I have not experimented with the addressable flavors but have read about them.

Ron
 
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