'Complimentary' trips to Coventry

Thread Starter

Hypatia's Protege

Joined Mar 1, 2015
3,226
Re: The pop-up triggered via left-clicking on a member's avatar

Kind friends --- it's wayyyy too easy to inadvertently click 'ignore' when attempting to view the member's profile! :( --- Inasmuch as an unintentional 'follow' isn't particularly egregious, a ready fix may, depending upon the 'malleability' of the forum software, be realized via transposition of 'follow' and 'ignore'...?

Advance thanks for your consideration:)
HP
 
Last edited:

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
10,461
Maybe that order derives from the long established practice of putting yes before no, or true before false, or agree before disagree in questionnaires? That is, the more positive response comes before the more negative.

I see no problem in the present order.

John
 

Thread Starter

Hypatia's Protege

Joined Mar 1, 2015
3,226
Maybe that order derives from the long established practice of putting yes before no, or true before false, or agree before disagree in questionnaires? That is, the more positive response comes before the more negative.

I see no problem in the present order.

John
Merely that, as arranged, it places 'ignore' immediately below 'profile page' and, hence, 'in harms way';)

Thanks for your response!:)
HP
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
10,461
There is something to be said about taking great care when evaluating people. A slip of the cursor is easily reversed. Nothing can be made fool proof.

John
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
21,594
There is a definition that may be lost on some who are unaware of the double meaning! :)
--Sent to Coventry-
"A British Idiom meaning to deliberately ostracise someone. Typically, this is done by not talking to him, avoiding his company and generally pretending that he no longer exists. "
Max.:p
 

Thread Starter

Hypatia's Protege

Joined Mar 1, 2015
3,226
Nothing can be made fool proof...
Indeed! Still, that does not argue against improvement!:) --- Moreover, inasmuch as there would seem to be a 'web-wide' consensus regarding the hiding of posts as puerile, craven and just plain obnoxious behavior (to say nothing of its contribution to response redundancy). *No one* needs the 'social landmine' posed by the option's proximity to the (frequently followed) 'profile page' link...

Again, sincere thanks for your input!:)

There is a definition that may be lost on some who are unaware of the double meaning! :)
--Sent to Coventry-
"A British Idiom meaning to deliberately ostracise someone. Typically, this is done by not talking to him, avoiding his company and generally pretending that he no longer exists. "
Max.:p
Thanks for that! :) --- I had (it seems incorrectly) assumed well-neigh ubiquity throughout English (i.e. English 'speaking') culture... Tho' I can confirm the idiom's frequent use in my home town -- and that's da-truth! --- See what I did there? Du-lut..... no? Well... ok!:( Guess I'd better cancel my interview at the Improv :p

Best regards
HP
 
Last edited:

Treeman

Joined May 22, 2014
157
There is a definition that may be lost on some who are unaware of the double meaning! :)
--Sent to Coventry-
"A British Idiom meaning to deliberately ostracise someone. Typically, this is done by not talking to him, avoiding his company and generally pretending that he no longer exists. "
Max.:p
To further improve your English Max - it comes from WW2 when Jerry (Hun,Bosch) successfully blew up Coventry rendering everyone deaf. This is how one is ostracized - falling on deaf ears. No harm done unless the bang brings back hearing and the gossip is heard.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
21,594
To further improve your English Max - it comes from WW2 .
I was far enough away at the time, enough not to be deafened anyway!:p

Actually there are a couple of origins, the first appeared in a dictionary in 1811, Coarse Language Definitions.

Also in the 17th century, when this phrase is supposed to have originated, Coventry was a small town. It has been suggested that the phrase, although we now use it in an allusory sense, originated from people being actually sent there.
The story - and it is no more than that - is that Cromwell sent a group of Royalist soldiers to be imprisoned in Coventry, around 1648. The locals, who were parliamentary supporters, shunned them and refused to consort with them.
Max.
 

Treeman

Joined May 22, 2014
157
I was far enough away at the time, enough not to be deafened anyway!:p

Actually there are a couple of origins, the first appeared in a dictionary in 1811, Coarse Language Definitions.

Also in the 17th century, when this phrase is supposed to have originated, Coventry was a small town. It has been suggested that the phrase, although we now use it in an allusory sense, originated from people being actually sent there.
The story - and it is no more than that - is that Cromwell sent a group of Royalist soldiers to be imprisoned in Coventry, around 1648. The locals, who were parliamentary supporters, shunned them and refused to consort with them.
Max.
It doesn't sur[rise me Max that you know more History than an Englishman.
 

studiot

Joined Nov 9, 2007
4,998
There is something to be said about taking great care when evaluating people. A slip of the cursor is easily reversed. Nothing can be made fool proof.

John
Why should I care if a fool ignores me?
 
Top